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2012-09-30 6:43 PM

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Subject: Swim Drill List

Hey guys i'm making a general list of swim drills to do with swim workouts, here's what I have so far, are there any others that you guys always include in your workout.

Catch up

Fingertip

Fist drill

Single arm drill

Sculling

Gallop Drill (never heard of this one but gonna throw it in)

This is the same as the 6-Count Drill above, but you take three strokes as you switch from side to side. Focus on long strokes and quick hips in these three strokes, completely rotating from one side to the other. Maintain great body position while kicking on your side!

 If you have one for me please feel free to add 



2012-09-30 10:32 PM
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Subject: RE: Swim Drill List
If you have someone watching you our good self awareness "the pause" drill is good for focus on keeping your legs horizontal aligned with your back, nice and high (during the pause). The main focus is keeping your elbow higher than your wrist and keeping your elbow high during the catch phase of swimming.

How to: swim 3 strokes regular after pushing off the wall then right before your hand enters the water pause for three seconds, keep kicking and analyze where your body sits. Just repeat with every stroke from then on out.
2012-10-01 5:17 AM
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Subject: RE: Swim Drill List
There aren't any drills that I always include in training sessions. All drills have a specific purpose, so different ones should be done depending on the issues we're trying to improve. Doing random drills can be a waste of time. Think of them like medicine. If you have a headache, you're going to take a pill for that, not one for chest congestion.
2012-10-01 7:19 AM
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Subject: RE: Swim Drill List
HIA: Hand in armpit. Touching your armpit with the thumb as you advance the arm over water, to practice high relaxed elbows and enough rotation for keeping your arm free of the water.
2012-10-01 8:31 AM
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Subject: RE: Swim Drill List

i like the sideline kicking drill--

it's simple. position your body on your side with the arm closest to the bottom extended in front of you and the other arm laying on your "up" side. kick on your side to the other end of the pool. freestyle back. repeat on the other side. 

it helps with rotation. 

2012-10-01 8:46 AM
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Subject: RE: Swim Drill List

erik.norgaard - 2012-10-01 8:19 AM HIA: Hand in armpit. Touching your armpit with the thumb as you advance the arm over water, to practice high relaxed elbows and enough rotation for keeping your arm free of the water.

something similar, the zipper drill.. like you have a zipper from hip to arm pit.

10 and 2 - to prevent cross over



Edited by capt211 2012-10-01 8:51 AM


2012-10-01 8:46 AM
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Subject: RE: Swim Drill List

infamous double post



Edited by capt211 2012-10-01 8:47 AM
2012-10-01 8:50 AM
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Subject: RE: Swim Drill List

geez- triple post.

*logs off now...* 

 



Edited by capt211 2012-10-01 8:51 AM
2012-10-01 12:47 PM
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Subject: RE: Swim Drill List

As a TI student I also do Skate, which I consider as one of the most important drills, teaching you streamlining. I think all the others I do such as Spearswitch, Zenswitch etc. are similar to the ones already listed above, just have different names. However I turn on my back to breath and then refocus and go on.

TI drills specifically target beginners though, so if you are an advanced swimmer you may not really do some of them.

2012-10-01 12:54 PM
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Subject: RE: Swim Drill List
mindy00 - 2012-10-01 9:31 AM

i like the sideline kicking drill--

it's simple. position your body on your side with the arm closest to the bottom extended in front of you and the other arm laying on your "up" side. kick on your side to the other end of the pool. freestyle back. repeat on the other side. 

it helps with rotation. 



I like this one as well, but at the half-way point of each length, I'll slide the top arm up the length of my side and do the thumb/armpit thing, then slowly continue it forward into a pseudo stroke as I roll to the other side. When the thumb of the top arm hits the armpit, begin the pull with the arm below the surface.

It doesn't really change anything, but it breaks up the monotony of a full lap on my side, for me.
2012-10-01 1:11 PM
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Subject: RE: Swim Drill List
How about a nice kickboard drill?  If you hardcore swimmers out there think this is a waste of time, don't hesitate to disagree and let me know why....not my favorite but have told that it can be helpful.


2012-10-04 2:25 PM
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14

Subject: RE: Swim Drill List

Freestyle drills are generally counterproductive because
they reinforce positions and motions that are not consistent with optimal
technique. For example, catch-up drill promotes ineffective arm synchronization
resulting in gaps in propulsion, fluctuations in body velocity, and an
inefficient use of energy. In addition, any drill that positions the arm
parallel to the surface or maintains the arm in the entry position causes
excess shoulder stress. More info about drills is posted here - http://www.swimmingtechnology.com/index.php/technique/how-to-benefit-the-most-from-swimming-drills/

Drills are extremely beneficial for the bilateral strokes (breaststroke
and butterfly). In freestyle, however, swimmers progress much faster by
focusing on specific technique elements within a normal stroke cycle. A free
e-book sample is posted here - http://www.swimmingtechnology.com/index.php/approaching-perfect-freestyle/sample-the-freestyle-e-book/

2012-10-04 2:55 PM
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Subject: RE: Swim Drill List
Rod Havriluk - 2012-10-04 3:25 PM

Freestyle drills are generally counterproductive because
they reinforce positions and motions that are not consistent with optimal
technique. For example, catch-up drill promotes ineffective arm synchronization
resulting in gaps in propulsion, fluctuations in body velocity, and an
inefficient use of energy. In addition, any drill that positions the arm
parallel to the surface or maintains the arm in the entry position causes
excess shoulder stress. More info about drills is posted here - http://www.swimmingtechnology.com/index.php/technique/how-to-benefit-the-most-from-swimming-drills/

Drills are extremely beneficial for the bilateral strokes (breaststroke
and butterfly). In freestyle, however, swimmers progress much faster by
focusing on specific technique elements within a normal stroke cycle. A free
e-book sample is posted here - http://www.swimmingtechnology.com/index.php/approaching-perfect-freestyle/sample-the-freestyle-e-book/

WOW.

I just took a quick look at this ebook. it is so full of information I cant digest it all at once.

Thank you for this . The Photos are amazing.

 

2012-10-04 3:47 PM
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Subject: RE: Swim Drill List
Ankle band swim ftw!
2012-10-04 4:16 PM
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Subject: RE: Swim Drill List

I regularly do one-arm skating, finger-tip drag, and one-arm swimming drills.  I always forget about the fist drill, but I'll add that back in.  

I don't do traditional catch-up drills because I don't like training to enter the water at the mid-line.  I tried a modified catch-up without touching hands, but it dramatically screwed up my rhythm, balance, and rotation, so I dropped catch-up all together. 

2012-10-04 6:45 PM
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Subject: RE: Swim Drill List
As many others have said, drills need to target your specific deficiencies. All drills try to target a specific benefit, yet suffer from having some element that is not optimal...so you need to know why you are practicing and waht you are hoping to get from the drill.

I like the skating drill for most swimmers for the following things
-controlling body rotation (not over rotating)
-learning to extend the lead arm on a wide track (to help correct or prevent crossing over)
-learning to relax the head in a lead arm extended position (frequently when reachign forward, the head/ eyes follow an upscooped hand)
-learning to relax the lead arm and position fingers below wrist below elbow below shoulder (avoding the straight in front position Rod warned about)
-learning what to do with the trailing arm...many will pose the trailing arm with elbow bent and pointing behidn the back (ie right elbow points over the back towards the swimmers left). Learning to relax this position and bring the elbow below the surface ready to swing away from the midline rather than being 'picked up' helps the swimmer learn how EVERY body part affects balance. positively & negatively, both fore & aft as well as right/left.

These learning points are not just for beginners.

Know what you are correcting prior to doing a drill. Just because a drill has a downside also doesn't mean you should not do it...as long as you know ahead of time what the downside is, so that you don't take the wrong thing from the drill.

In general I believe that the more fluent you are int he water, the better swimmer you can become. But being a good driller is not necessarily being a good swimmer. However a good driller can probably become a good swimmer easier than someone who struggles with drills.

As Rod points out, drills are not necessary for everyone to do. Drills help imprint target body positions, including those 'check points' that rod includes in his book. But you can learn adn improve a lot with whole stroke swimming using "stroke thoughts" which include physical check points, but also include sensations to experience (like cool air on your shoulder blade or buttock cheek with optimal rotation, timing cues (watching the underside of the water get closer as you rotate to breath, and much more.


2012-10-04 7:31 PM
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Subject: RE: Swim Drill List
I love her passion for both the art of swimming and teaching.. No, I'm not hitting on AB.
2012-10-04 7:42 PM
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Subject: RE: Swim Drill List
mad-dog - 2012-10-04 6:31 PM

I love her passion for both the art of swimming and teaching.. No, I'm not hitting on AB.


Although if you were, how would I know? (I just want to know when to blush...)
2012-10-04 10:40 PM
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Subject: RE: Swim Drill List
Since you didn't call out freestyle specifically I love Butterfly kick on your belly with your thumbs locked behind your back. Great for learning the propulsion you need from your legs. Breathe forward every two kicks like you would if you were using your arms. Also just good for a butt kicking. For freestyle I love barrel drill- focus on putting your arms in the water like you are putting them over a barrel and rolling it towards you.

Edited by Moonrocket 2012-10-04 10:42 PM
2012-10-17 3:40 PM
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Subject: RE: Swim Drill List

I’m glad you enjoyed my e-book.

In evaluating a freestyle drill, it is most important to
determine if the drill replicates effective technique. Most drills position the
arms with poor leverage and shoulder stress. Consequently, drills typically do
not provide the “deliberate” or “focused” practice required to optimize the
skill learning process. Progress is accelerated by using strategies that focus
on specific cues within a normal stroke cycle.

http://www.swimmingtechnology.com/index.php/technique/

Rod Havriluk, Ph.D.

Swimming Technology Research

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