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2012-12-03 3:08 PM


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Subject: Weight training and beginner triathlete

Hi everyone. I have recently became interested in triathlons and I am considering  training for a sprint. I found some sample programs on here and plan on trying one.

What type of a weight lifting schedule is recommended during training for a triathlon?

I already work out at a gym lifting weights about 3 days a week. It's a very basic workout, I'm not looking to get huge, just trying to keep fit and bulk up slightly (pretty skinny guy lol)

Can I conitnue safely lifting 3 days a week without over working my body while training for a sprint triathlon?

Also..I came across "mini-sprint" on this site, if I have never ran an event before would this be something better to try as a firt time racer?

Thanks!



2012-12-03 7:38 PM
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Subject: RE: Weight training and beginner triathlete
Congrats on wanted to keep lifting and do TRIs. Great choice. Lifting 3 days a week is a good base and as long as you can handle the time for both your lifting and a sprint program I say go for it. What are your strengths and weaknesses in regards to TRI ( swim/bike/run)? Also what is your lifting program now? I think a mini sprint is a great way to see if you would enjoy the sport. Give it a shot and take it from there.
2013-03-10 6:21 AM
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Subject: RE: Weight training and beginner triathlete

Concur. I you wish to do both AND neither conflicts with the other, then go for it. I am preping for a 1/2 currently and although my training is somewhat limited due to present location, I'm a firm believer in weight training ICW tri training. My focus is on Tri. If weight training were to get in the way, it would have to go. I've been physically active for the past 33 years doing some form of training every day (Special Forces).

I feel that in order to perform better at tri's, you have to do the things that increase your performance... Swim... Bike ... Run.. Weight training should be used to enhance/build endurance of those muscle groups used to conduct tri specific events.

Drive hard!

2013-03-12 2:51 PM
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Subject: RE: Weight training and beginner triathlete

Lifting weights is a great compliment to triathlon training.

2013-03-12 3:16 PM
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Subject: RE: Weight training and beginner triathlete
Alphamale - 2013-03-12 2:51 PM

Lifting weights is a great compliment to triathlon training.

 

Please see compliment.  Weight lifting has several positives, none of which will directly lead to speed or endurance.

 

Lifting and endurance training use two different groups of muscle fiber for the most part and two different energy systems.

2013-03-18 1:54 PM
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Subject: RE: Weight training and beginner triathlete
I'm not sure what the policy is here on linking personal websites, but I did actually write an article on this exact sort of thing...  any mod let me know if it's ok to link it?


2013-03-18 3:11 PM
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Subject: RE: Weight training and beginner triathlete

AlexViada - 2013-03-18 1:54 PM I'm not sure what the policy is here on linking personal websites, but I did actually write an article on this exact sort of thing...  any mod let me know if it's ok to link it?

 

Link it

2013-03-18 6:41 PM
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Subject: RE: Weight training and beginner triathlete

Cheers.  I know that Mike already referenced one in another post, but I put these together from the viewpoint of an individual with a current lifting bent who wants to get into endurance sports- the first article is the basic overview of the approach I take with my athletes, the second article has some sample routines.  A pretty wide variety of people have used these with different spins on 'em, Crossfitters to ultra endurance types (and a few powerlifters).  Just thought I'd throw this out there as another approach.

http://www.completehumanperformance.com/so-you-want-to-run-endurance-training-for-strength-athletes-part-1.html

http://www.completehumanperformance.com/so-you-want-to-run-part-2.html

Any comments or criticism of course welcome, but hopefully somebody may find this interesting.



Edited by AlexViada 2013-03-18 6:43 PM
2013-03-18 9:37 PM
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Subject: RE: Weight training and beginner triathlete
I've been doing crossfit for a year and it really has been a catalyst for fitness and getting into running and triathlon.
2013-04-16 11:59 AM
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Subject: RE: Weight training and beginner triathlete
AlexViada - 2013-03-18 7:41 PM

Cheers.  I know that Mike already referenced one in another post, but I put these together from the viewpoint of an individual with a current lifting bent who wants to get into endurance sports- the first article is the basic overview of the approach I take with my athletes, the second article has some sample routines.  A pretty wide variety of people have used these with different spins on 'em, Crossfitters to ultra endurance types (and a few powerlifters).  Just thought I'd throw this out there as another approach.

http://www.completehumanperformance.com/so-you-want-to-run-endurance-training-for-strength-athletes-part-1.html

http://www.completehumanperformance.com/so-you-want-to-run-part-2.html

Any comments or criticism of course welcome, but hopefully somebody may find this interesting.

I'm loving the article and I do find it interesting.  When I trained for Olypic level tris and Savageman, I pretty much ditched weight training.  This year I am training for my first full marathon.  At the same time, my son wants to prepare for football so I've been training him.  In the process, I'm finding my muscle memory is coming back strong.  After only a month back I felt comfortable enough to get a "near" max.  I say "near" because I'm only going to do what I can comfortably do with a 14yr old as a spotter.  I've put up 300 already and I'm seeing my strength fly up very quickly.  I've started becoming a little concerned about how the two different types of training will conflict so your article is timely for me. 

Just to add to the discussion, I just turned 43 yesterday and I have been wondering about testosterone levels and recovery.  When strenth training, I feel as though the body tends to produce more testosterone for recovery.  As I have to take on longer runs for the marathon training, I have wondered about whether weight training could provide the benefit of reduced risk of injury since the body should (in theory) be able to recovery faster.  However, what is the point of diminishing point of returns as it relates to weight.  Whereas while tri training, I dropped weight, I am seeing that I am merely maintaining my weight while running and strenth training.  Finally, will the weight loss eventually kick in as the runs become longer and the muscle level is more dense and the testosterone levels are higher?

Sorry.. just a lot of questions and your writings just made me think about them even more.  That's a sign that you did a good job.

2013-04-19 4:35 PM
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Subject: RE: Weight training and beginner triathlete
Alex,

"I love that runner’s high that kicks in around mile 20!” Said no powerlifter, ever"

LOL,, thanks for the link. Just scanned it briefly, looking forward to studying it. I'm getting into endurance activities to transform my body into something more lean and to get healthier. While I don't get the runners high (yet) but when I did an hour on the stationary bike and then did a 10 min transition run on the treadmill I felt like Rocky running up those stairs!

My problem is that it's hard for me to slow down and begin training. Haven't run in years and in the first two weeks of my sprint training I got up to 30 mins of 10:20 min/miles. Bet you can guess that I spent this week unable to work out due to knee pain.

I'm having a hard time shifting into the take it easy mindset.
I look forward to reading your articles as I have to learn how to run 5 mins/walk 2 (ugh). I feel like I have to make up gym time doing some kind of workout. Being female (and 53) I don't think lifting leaves me too bulked up (though I don't know what I will look like after some weight loss and a few years of endurance work), but I don't want to put effort into work that will hinder my plans of doing an ironman one day.

Mitzi


2013-04-25 10:16 AM
in reply to: #4702712


23

Subject: RE: Weight training and beginner triathlete
Pector55 - 2013-04-16 12:59 PM 

I'm loving the article and I do find it interesting.  When I trained for Olypic level tris and Savageman, I pretty much ditched weight training.  This year I am training for my first full marathon.  At the same time, my son wants to prepare for football so I've been training him.  In the process, I'm finding my muscle memory is coming back strong.  After only a month back I felt comfortable enough to get a "near" max.  I say "near" because I'm only going to do what I can comfortably do with a 14yr old as a spotter.  I've put up 300 already and I'm seeing my strength fly up very quickly.  I've started becoming a little concerned about how the two different types of training will conflict so your article is timely for me. 

Just to add to the discussion, I just turned 43 yesterday and I have been wondering about testosterone levels and recovery.  When strenth training, I feel as though the body tends to produce more testosterone for recovery.  As I have to take on longer runs for the marathon training, I have wondered about whether weight training could provide the benefit of reduced risk of injury since the body should (in theory) be able to recovery faster.  However, what is the point of diminishing point of returns as it relates to weight.  Whereas while tri training, I dropped weight, I am seeing that I am merely maintaining my weight while running and strenth training.  Finally, will the weight loss eventually kick in as the runs become longer and the muscle level is more dense and the testosterone levels are higher?

Sorry.. just a lot of questions and your writings just made me think about them even more.  That's a sign that you did a good job.

 

Oye, apologies for the late reply here- never refreshed my cache on this page so didn't see the post!

As you mentioned- a number of reasons that weight training does speed recovery, some hormonally related, some structural.  First, yes, absolutely, there is a marked increase in both free and bound test levels in weight trained individuals versus non, though the release from a single workout is usually rather minimal and insignificant (I mention this only because it was a fad about a decade ago to "optimize" lifting routines for testosterone release, which was a bit backwards).  As you get older, this increase becomes smaller but still noticeable.

What I think is far more interesting, though, is the release of several other repair factors following weight training.  The theory for a while has been that hormone release is one of the primary causes of muscle hypertrophy, and in the absence of hormone release, muscle is simply not built.  More recent analysis shows that mechanical loading itself can DIRECTLY trigger the systems for muscle growth and repair, though.  (Do a search on MTOR- though make sure you avoid fitness writer's take on MTOR.  Just read the journals, otherwise you'll get a face full of pseudo science!) How this translates- direct mechanical loading from weight training seems to be enough to trigger growth and repair factors that running alone might not do, which in turn suggests that regular strength training (especially of the lower body) can actually speed the repair process, reduce DOMS, and accelerate return to peak performance.  

Add on the benefit of increased bone density and improved tendon/ligament strength, and you truly do reduce your risk for injury, particularly since a proper lifting routine should strengthen the ENTIRE athlete, not just be sports specific (i.e., I'm not a fan of cyclists doing nothing but lunges and quarter squats- if your weight training is too similar to your chosen activity, you're doing nothing to correct imbalances...  you're simply exacerbating them).  So lifting while running should also help stave off a lot of chronic injuries from running, including IT band issues, knee and ankle pain from asymmetric loading, etc.  

As far as bodyweight goes, I'd assume there's some incentive to drop weight to improve performance without losing the benefits of strength training- to that end I'd recommend adopting a primarily dynamic effort (explosive speed, low absolute weight, low repetitions) routine.  These tend not to be ideal for hypertrophy (and therefore should let you shed some weight), but still do wonders to improve joint stability, coordination, and overall strength (without the heavy joint loading of maximum effort).  

Glad you enjoyed the article!

2013-04-25 10:21 AM
in reply to: #4707570


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Subject: RE: Weight training and beginner triathlete

MuscleMomma - 2013-04-19 5:35 PM

Being female (and 53) I don't think lifting leaves me too bulked up (though I don't know what I will look like after some weight loss and a few years of endurance work), but I don't want to put effort into work that will hinder my plans of doing an ironman one day. Mitzi

 

Heya Mitzi.  Absolutely don't think it'll hinder you!    The biggest things (of course) are to make sure your lifting never leaves you injured and never hurts your s/b/r.  

That said, this might be the perfect time to really ramp up the lifting, as the improvements to bone density and muscle tonus are pretty critical when you start increasing the distance.

I remember talking to James Lawrence (Iron Cowboy- did 30 Ironmans in a year, and an awesome guy) in the airport after Cozumel, and he was talking about how much strength training he did in his offseason to prepare for what he was about to do to himself.  Great lesson there- lift while you have the bandwidth, because as the distances pick up you'll have less and less time. 

If you check out the contact us page and want to shoot me a note for some simple routine ideas, I'd be glad to help out- my fiancee is an ultra runner and still manages to get in two lifts a week (and is making great progress), so I can even send you her lifting routine.  At her size (5'6", 115 pounds), any extra bulk makes 60-100 mile runs exponentially more taxing, so her routine's pretty minimal as far as size gains go.  

2013-06-04 3:18 PM
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Subject: RE: Weight training and beginner triathlete
Originally posted by AlexViada

Pector55 - 2013-04-16 12:59 PM 

I'm loving the article and I do find it interesting.  When I trained for Olypic level tris and Savageman, I pretty much ditched weight training.  This year I am training for my first full marathon.  At the same time, my son wants to prepare for football so I've been training him.  In the process, I'm finding my muscle memory is coming back strong.  After only a month back I felt comfortable enough to get a "near" max.  I say "near" because I'm only going to do what I can comfortably do with a 14yr old as a spotter.  I've put up 300 already and I'm seeing my strength fly up very quickly.  I've started becoming a little concerned about how the two different types of training will conflict so your article is timely for me. 

Just to add to the discussion, I just turned 43 yesterday and I have been wondering about testosterone levels and recovery.  When strenth training, I feel as though the body tends to produce more testosterone for recovery.  As I have to take on longer runs for the marathon training, I have wondered about whether weight training could provide the benefit of reduced risk of injury since the body should (in theory) be able to recovery faster.  However, what is the point of diminishing point of returns as it relates to weight.  Whereas while tri training, I dropped weight, I am seeing that I am merely maintaining my weight while running and strenth training.  Finally, will the weight loss eventually kick in as the runs become longer and the muscle level is more dense and the testosterone levels are higher?

Sorry.. just a lot of questions and your writings just made me think about them even more.  That's a sign that you did a good job.

 

Oye, apologies for the late reply here- never refreshed my cache on this page so didn't see the post!

As you mentioned- a number of reasons that weight training does speed recovery, some hormonally related, some structural.  First, yes, absolutely, there is a marked increase in both free and bound test levels in weight trained individuals versus non, though the release from a single workout is usually rather minimal and insignificant (I mention this only because it was a fad about a decade ago to "optimize" lifting routines for testosterone release, which was a bit backwards).  As you get older, this increase becomes smaller but still noticeable.

What I think is far more interesting, though, is the release of several other repair factors following weight training.  The theory for a while has been that hormone release is one of the primary causes of muscle hypertrophy, and in the absence of hormone release, muscle is simply not built.  More recent analysis shows that mechanical loading itself can DIRECTLY trigger the systems for muscle growth and repair, though.  (Do a search on MTOR- though make sure you avoid fitness writer's take on MTOR.  Just read the journals, otherwise you'll get a face full of pseudo science!) How this translates- direct mechanical loading from weight training seems to be enough to trigger growth and repair factors that running alone might not do, which in turn suggests that regular strength training (especially of the lower body) can actually speed the repair process, reduce DOMS, and accelerate return to peak performance.  

Add on the benefit of increased bone density and improved tendon/ligament strength, and you truly do reduce your risk for injury, particularly since a proper lifting routine should strengthen the ENTIRE athlete, not just be sports specific (i.e., I'm not a fan of cyclists doing nothing but lunges and quarter squats- if your weight training is too similar to your chosen activity, you're doing nothing to correct imbalances...  you're simply exacerbating them).  So lifting while running should also help stave off a lot of chronic injuries from running, including IT band issues, knee and ankle pain from asymmetric loading, etc.  

As far as bodyweight goes, I'd assume there's some incentive to drop weight to improve performance without losing the benefits of strength training- to that end I'd recommend adopting a primarily dynamic effort (explosive speed, low absolute weight, low repetitions) routine.  These tend not to be ideal for hypertrophy (and therefore should let you shed some weight), but still do wonders to improve joint stability, coordination, and overall strength (without the heavy joint loading of maximum effort).  

Glad you enjoyed the article!




So I will add that I am now on week 10 of a 30 week marathon plan. I am now down 6lbs and over Memorial Day I got a new bench press max of 340lbs. My personal best ever is 380 but I hope to hit that by the end of the year, then hit 400 in 2014.

I look forward to entering some pump in runs in the future.
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