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2013-01-10 11:19 AM

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Subject: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue

Hey Folks!

 

I've looked at some of the swim plans and followed many swim threads on these forums but I am still searching for a good structured plan to maintain my swim speed.

I'm happy with my 45sec 50s (I haven't timed a 100 but I know its sub 2m), but what type of workout do I need to be doing in order to build up the fitness to sustain these speeds over the distance? More intervals? More long distance pace swimming?

Is it just an overall fitness level issue (I've only been training 6months) or do I need to be doing something swim specific?

My caviot is that I can only goto the pool 1x a week for about 45-90min. So "just swim more" isn't really an option right now.

 

Thanks in advance!



Edited by LPJmom 2013-01-10 11:23 AM


2013-01-10 12:05 PM
in reply to: #4571960

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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue

I'm sure some of the swimming guru's will chime in, but FWIW, my "core" or default workout when I'm crunched for time and only have an hour to swim is:

4 x 100 warm up (with the 3rd 25 either breast or back)

10 x 50 free

100 breast

6 x 100 free

200 warm down

1800 yds total

I also like to do pyramid workouts, which I think helps to build endurance and adds some variety.  About once a month I'll do a 1000 time trial to measure my fitness.  (I should probably mention that I only do sprint races with a maximum half mile swim.  I wouldn't try to do anything longer without adding significant swim volume).

The old rule of thumb is that you need to swim three times per week to improve, twice to maintain, and only swimming once per week, you'll actually lose ground.  Like you, I'm pretty time crunched, but seem to do "OK" if I can swim at least twice a week.

Good luck,

Mark

2013-01-10 12:10 PM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue
The short answer is build aerobic endurance and improve yoru swim efficiency.

You've given us a partial starting poitn and a partial goal.

You can swim those 50s & 100 paces for how long on how much rest? What RPE?

How long have you been swimming?

How many strokes does it take you to swim a 25?

What's the furtherest distanc eyou can swim, or have swum?

What's your goal? (ie 500yd sprint @ 2 min/100 vs IM swim at 1:05)
2013-01-10 12:23 PM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue
LPJmom - 2013-01-10 10:19 AM

Hey Folks!

 

I've looked at some of the swim plans and followed many swim threads on these forums but I am still searching for a good structured plan to maintain my swim speed.



Also, I just want to comment here that depending on how you're swimming these 50s, it's probabaly unrealistic to expect to simply swim further and maintain your current speed due to fatigue.

50 yards/ 50 seconds is too short to really tap into your aerobic energy usage and there is likely some anaerobic or strength related contribution to that time. The further you swim the more your body relies on aerobic energy..

There is a normal decay of speed as your distance increases, so unless your 50yd/50sec is very slow for you...ie your RPE is a 1-3/10, you won't simply maintain that.

However if you answer some of the other questions I posted I can give you some ideas
2013-01-10 9:14 PM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue
LPJmom - 2013-01-10 11:19 AM

My caviot is that I can only goto the pool 1x a week for about 45-90min. So "just swim more" isn't really an option right now.

Do you think you could improve your bike or run only doing those disciplines once a week for 45-90 minutes?  I doubt you can maintain swim fitness with that little time spent, and highly doubt you could build fitness.  Perhaps you should consider duathlons until you can allocate more time to swimming.  You could then take that time in the pool and do more running or biking.  Not trying to be a downer, but it seems like your best option.

2013-01-11 12:27 AM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue
You will gain more from swimming short repeats at a faster pace than long slow crap. If you only have 1swim/week work up to the full 90 minutes and get the most from it. Something like this...200 swim 200 kick with fins8 x 25 @45 strong200 kick with fins4 x 200 pull @ 4:00 - 4:30 aim just make pace time10 x 100 @ 2:20 -2:30 best average200"kick with fins easy40 x 25 @45 descend 1-4 (10x) the 4th on each round should be flat out200 very easy cool down4000 metres/yards


2013-01-11 12:27 AM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue
You will gain more from swimming short repeats at a faster pace than long slow crap. If you only have 1swim/week work up to the full 90 minutes and get the most from it. Something like this...200 swim 200 kick with fins8 x 25 @45 strong200 kick with fins4 x 200 pull @ 4:00 - 4:30 aim just make pace time10 x 100 @ 2:20 -2:30 best average200"kick with fins easy40 x 25 @45 descend 1-4 (10x) the 4th on each round should be flat out200 very easy cool down4000 metres/yards
2013-01-11 1:19 AM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue
Swim more.  Sorry...there are no shortcuts.
2013-01-11 4:32 AM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue

For the swim: Start doing longer intervals and longer workouts when time permits. Two things you can do to build endurance and maintain pace over longer distances. Make the long interval sets longer, that is, not more reps but longer. Instead of 100 do 200. Make speed sets of longer intervals too, instead of 50 do 100. Keep rest the same, doubling the distance should not double the rest.

Your swim performance will benefit from general fitness, if you can't go to the pool, both run and bike will have a positive effect. What run and bike lack is building upper body and core strength. So, do a strength workout focusing on core and upper body, in particular lats.

BR

2013-01-11 6:46 AM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue
erik.norgaard - 2013-01-11 5:32 AM

For the swim: Start doing longer intervals and longer workouts when time permits. Two things you can do to build endurance and maintain pace over longer distances. Make the long interval sets longer, that is, not more reps but longer. Instead of 100 do 200. Make speed sets of longer intervals too, instead of 50 do 100. Keep rest the same, doubling the distance should not double the rest.

Agree with this, especially keep the rest the same. When swimming, I rarely do sets over 200 but I take very little rest throughout my workout. 5-10 seconds max between sets, just to refocus.

I like 10 x 100 or 5 x 200 on an interval. I like to start with an aggressive interval that gives me little rest. If I really can't hit it, increase by 5 seconds.

You could do longer sets, I just have a boredom problem in the pool. I need to mix it up a lot.

2013-01-11 7:11 AM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue

IMO do lots of 10x100's or 10x50 sets.  10-15 seconds in between each 100/50.  No more than 15 seconds rest though.  I think most people don't put enough emphasis into swimming as they should.  It works your core more than any of the other three sports imo and it also works your' heart and aerobic sytem great.  Your' heart can't tell what your' body is doing when it comes to exercise between running/swimming/biking.

Here was this mornings workout crammed into about 40-45 minutes.

500 WU

6x75's pull on the 1:05

5x100 Base +5 seconds so it was on the 1:25

50 free  recovery on the 1:00

4x100 Base so on the 1:20

50 recovery on the 1:00

3x100 Base -5 seconds so onthe 1:15

50 recovery on the 1:00

2x100 Base -10 seconds so on the 1:10 (this part was hell!)

50 recovery on the 1:00

Then 100 with everything you've got left.

Cooldown.



2013-01-11 8:25 AM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue

AdventureBear - 2013-01-10 1:10 PM The short answer is build aerobic endurance and improve yoru swim efficiency. You've given us a partial starting poitn and a partial goal. You can swim those 50s & 100 paces for how long on how much rest? What RPE? How long have you been swimming? How many strokes does it take you to swim a 25? What's the furtherest distanc eyou can swim, or have swum? What's your goal? (ie 500yd sprint @ 2 min/100 vs IM swim at 1:05)

Although I started my Tri training 6months ago, I didn't start swimming until 4months ago. At that time I took a total immersion swim class to make sure I had the proper technique. Prior to 4months ago, I hadn't swam laps in a pool for 20 years. I have swim team experience as a kid.

The last time I checked my stroke count was 2 months ago. My easy pace was 20 strokes/25 and when I sprinted a 25 it was 16 strokes. I was able to sprint 50s at a 50sec pace. Roughly around the same time I wanted to know approximately how long it would take me to do a 500. I only glanced at the clock and swam and when I looked back up at the clock it was less then 10min. I think its fair to say that I can do a 500 in 10min.

Since my previous months of swimming left me with an unsatisfying sense of a workout I only just started incorporating intervals. I'm trying to learn how to do them in a constructive way.

Last week attempt at intervals was doing 50s on each minute. I could do 2 at 45seconds, then next 2 was more like 50seconds, followed by 2 more at 55 seconds. At that point I couldn't go faster then 1:05 for a 50 and my technique was out the window. I refocused and relaxed with a 300 and worked on 50s again.

Since I have unstructured swim workouts, each week has been different and I don't have a lap counter so I don't know distances. I normally swim between 45min-1hour. I swam for 90min a couple of times.

My short term goals are to win my AG in a sprint try and just finish an Olympic this summer. My long term goal is an IM in about 2017.

 

 

 



Edited by LPJmom 2013-01-11 8:30 AM
2013-01-11 8:56 AM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue

If your goal is to win your AG in a sprint and you just started swimming 4 months ago, unless you're in a very sparsely attended AG, it might be better to set your sights differently. You don't win an AG podium spot, generally speaking, unless you're competitive on the swim, and competitive is a lot faster than a 2:00/100y pace. That being said, so what?  It takes a LOT of time to trim minutes off your swim, and if your schedule is as crammed as you say (can only swim 1x a week for 90 minutes), you're not going to win that spot coming out of the water, so you better hustle elsewhere. If you really think you can win your AG, settle on that swim pace and shave off a couple minutes from your transitions, bike or run. Worry about swimming when you have the time to train for it.

Swimming is, as Suzanne (AdventureBear) says, about form and fitness. Even if a TI instructor signed off on your form (which, for what it's worth, isn't exactly a blessing of anything!), I PROMISE your form needs work. We ALL need work, and the longer you have been swimming, the more you know this. Technique isn't something you pick up over a couple of lessons, it takes practice practice practice and even more practice. That's all about time in the water, and to echo others, there is simply no shortcut for that. You *can* work on your fitness outside the pool, but swim fitness is NOT all the same. You can have the cardio engine of a marathon monster, but unless you swim more, it won't mean much in the water. 

I wish there was a secret - we all do! But to be good at this crazy sport - which it sounds like you want to be - it takes a LOT of training, and there are no shortcuts.

2013-01-11 9:03 AM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue

In my opinion, it is hard to build swim speed endurance by swimming 50s or 100s. Although, you still need them. If I had only 45-90 minutes for a swim I would focus on something like this:

Short warm up

Main set: 8x200 free - 75% of effort - 30 seconds rest

OR

5X400 - the second 200 is faster than first - 45-60 seconds of rest

or

100 - 200 - 300 - 400 - 400 - 300 - 200 - 100 where you maintain the pace of the first 100m for the whole set

After the main set do

10X50 or 6X75 with a good rest in beetween but push it to 80-85% of effort.

200 free cool down.

Good luck

P.S. I wrote all of this and then noticed that you are asking about "maintain swim speed". Are you focused on a sprint swims or long distances such as 1500/3800 m?

 

2013-01-11 9:04 AM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue

Thank you all for taking the time out to make suggestions. I am beginning to see what I need to do.

One other question about swim gear. On the forums I see alot of workouts that incorporate the various swim aids/gear like fins/bouys/kick board/paddles or what not... I personally am a sceptic when it comes to these aids. I don't really see thier importance. But, most of all, I strongly feel that I would need a coach to assist and guide me in the proper use of the equipment and correct drills. I don't want to teach myself bad techniques.

2013-01-11 9:06 AM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue
good choice. Is there a masters program near you? That would be the best option I would think. The one around here swims early in the morning, too, maybe yours will as well - can solve your timing problems!


2013-01-11 9:16 AM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue

I do not think you need them at this point.

Maybe a kick board or bouy, they can be incorporated in you warm ups or sets but again you can do well without

2013-01-11 9:44 AM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue
LPJmom - 2013-01-11 9:25 AM

AdventureBear - 2013-01-10 1:10 PM The short answer is build aerobic endurance and improve yoru swim efficiency. You've given us a partial starting poitn and a partial goal. You can swim those 50s & 100 paces for how long on how much rest? What RPE? How long have you been swimming? How many strokes does it take you to swim a 25? What's the furtherest distanc eyou can swim, or have swum? What's your goal? (ie 500yd sprint @ 2 min/100 vs IM swim at 1:05)

Although I started my Tri training 6months ago, I didn't start swimming until 4months ago. At that time I took a total immersion swim class to make sure I had the proper technique. Prior to 4months ago, I hadn't swam laps in a pool for 20 years. I have swim team experience as a kid.

The last time I checked my stroke count was 2 months ago. My easy pace was 20 strokes/25 and when I sprinted a 25 it was 16 strokes. I was able to sprint 50s at a 50sec pace. Roughly around the same time I wanted to know approximately how long it would take me to do a 500. I only glanced at the clock and swam and when I looked back up at the clock it was less then 10min. I think its fair to say that I can do a 500 in 10min.

Since my previous months of swimming left me with an unsatisfying sense of a workout I only just started incorporating intervals. I'm trying to learn how to do them in a constructive way.

Last week attempt at intervals was doing 50s on each minute. I could do 2 at 45seconds, then next 2 was more like 50seconds, followed by 2 more at 55 seconds. At that point I couldn't go faster then 1:05 for a 50 and my technique was out the window. I refocused and relaxed with a 300 and worked on 50s again.

Since I have unstructured swim workouts, each week has been different and I don't have a lap counter so I don't know distances. I normally swim between 45min-1hour. I swam for 90min a couple of times.

My short term goals are to win my AG in a sprint try and just finish an Olympic this summer. My long term goal is an IM in about 2017.

I am curious what are you basing this short term goal on? I assume you are podium finishing either your local 5k and 10k races and/or a CAT1 CAT2 bike racers. If swimming is new for you I assume you excel in one of the other 3 events?  From a life standpoint goals should be achievable is winning your age group achievable with 6 mos in the sport?

2013-01-11 10:37 AM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue

@Sidney&@Fisherman

I'm probably not painting the correct picture of my swim history/ability.

I have perspective and cause to be thinking about trying to win my AG based on last years local Tri results. I'm keeping myself excited and motivated by working hard so that I can race hard and try to win. 

 I know that I will see improvements the more I swim, and in the spring I will be able to, but for now I need to have the best possible option for the time allotted. Like I mentioned. I've recieved the feedback I was looking for so I can structure my workouts better and I thank you for that.

If people really want to know more about my motivation or fitness history, feel free to message me. I don't want this topic to get totally derailed.

 

2013-01-11 12:35 PM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue
LPJmom - 2013-01-11 7:25 AM

The last time I checked my stroke count was 2 months ago. My easy pace was 20 strokes/25 and when I sprinted a 25 it was 16 strokes. I was able to sprint 50s at a 50sec pace. Roughly around the same time I wanted to know approximately how long it would take me to do a 500. I only glanced at the clock and swam and when I looked back up at the clock it was less then 10min. I think its fair to say that I can do a 500 in 10min.

Since my previous months of swimming left me with an unsatisfying sense of a workout I only just started incorporating intervals. I'm trying to learn how to do them in a constructive way.

Last week attempt at intervals was doing 50s on each minute. I could do 2 at 45seconds, then next 2 was more like 50seconds, followed by 2 more at 55 seconds. At that point I couldn't go faster then 1:05 for a 50 and my technique was out the window. I refocused and relaxed with a 300 and worked on 50s again.

Since I have unstructured swim workouts, each week has been different and I don't have a lap counter so I don't know distances. I normally swim between 45min-1hour. I swam for 90min a couple of times.

My short term goals are to win my AG in a sprint try and just finish an Olympic this summer. My long term goal is an IM in about 2017.

 

 

 



Ok, this helps a lot. During the sprint, did you add a strong kick? or did your SPL go down naturally because you were moving faster?

Let's assume your current fitness is PR 50yd is 50 seconds and a PR 500 is 9:55. You can plug this into a math equation and show that your pace is slowing about 5% for every doubling of distance.

This is GOOD and a normal fatigue rate.

You do not have a problem maintaining your pace, you simply need to improve your fitness in swimming (as well as continue working on technique).

The key is doing sets that are challenging but not unrealistically difficult.

If you let go of the idea that you SHOULD be able to swim the same pace for a 500 as you do for a 50, you'll be happier in the pool and able to put together much more interesting sets.

Here are some projected paces for you based on the two times you gave...assuming those are "PR" times. (the formatting might get ruined but you can copy/paste and add 'tabs' to get the columns back.

So if you want to train to improve your fitness in the pool, use your current fitness level to create smart training sets, exactly the way we do with running & biking. Let's just take an 800 yd time as a target because that's good ballpark for a sprint. Based on your two times you shared, in theory right now you should be able to siwm an 800 in 16:26, or 2:03/100.

I know your first reaction is going to be "that's too slow" (I know because it was mine the first time I did this kind of analysis for a mile, HIM & IM swim times). But the reality is that is where you are at today and that's the current fitness you have to build on.

This is what I would suggest. Create swim sets that add up to about 800-1000 yards. Break it into intervals, but swim the intervals at this 800 yard pace with very short rest.

Examples:
15 x 50, targeting 60-62 seconds per 50, rest 10 seconds. (total 750 yards @ your 800 yard pace)
Do this as a test set and see if you can do it. If you can, add repeats or decrease rest the next time (don't increase your pace).

8 x 100 targeting 2:03/100, rest 10 seconds (total 800 yards @ your 800 yard pace).

or do some over distance sets
5 x 200 @ 4:05-4:06, leave every 2:30 (that would give you 25 seconds between 200s...feel free to decrease the rest if needed).

These types of sets will help your body build the aerobic endurance you'll need by allowing you to complete sets ata sustainable pace, within a challenging set of times that you 'should' be able to currently do.

Given your time constraints, I'd create about 20-30 minutes of swimming using these patterns. Spend another 15-20 minutes doing drills from your workshop that target your known weak points in your swim

Spend maybe 5-10 minutes doing some swimming at a faster pace for fun and variet as well as to build up some fast twitch.
Examples:
6- 8x25 on 30 seconds @ your best 100 pace. From the table below, 26 seconds per 25.

6-8 x 50 @ your 200 pace, or 55 seconds each 50. Leave every minute.


The most important thing is to base today's training off of todays fitness. IN a few weeks you can repeat a time trial for fastest 50s & fastest 500 and see if you've improved.

Throughout all of these sets, count your strokes so that you can track at what point your form seems ot be falling apart.

Have fun and feel free to PM me if you have questions.

For the curious, the equation for these tables is based on a fatigue curve for best times of an individual across 2 different distances. It's essentially Monod's critical power model, except using a 2nd order fit, rather than a linear fit..it's Daniels VDOT or McMillan running tables applied to swimming.



Distance Time Pace/100
100 01:45 01:45
200 03:42 01:51
300 05:43 01:54
400 07:48 01:57
500 09:55 01:59
750 15:20 02:03
800 16:26 02:03
1000 20:53 02:05
1500 32:19 02:09
1650 35:48 02:10

2013-01-11 12:37 PM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue
Edited: While I liked my snarkly reply to fisherman76, this popped up as the first post on page 2 fo this thread and was too distracting. Please see my last post on page 1. (and I'd be happy to look at your stroke )

Edited by AdventureBear 2013-01-11 12:42 PM


2013-03-14 11:51 AM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue
AdventureBear - 2013-01-11 1:35 PM Ok, this helps a lot. During the sprint, did you add a strong kick? or did your SPL go down naturally because you were moving faster? Let's assume your current fitness is PR 50yd is 50 seconds and a PR 500 is 9:55. You can plug this into a math equation and show that your pace is slowing about 5% for every doubling of distance. This is GOOD and a normal fatigue rate. You do not have a problem maintaining your pace, you simply need to improve your fitness in swimming (as well as continue working on technique). The key is doing sets that are challenging but not unrealistically difficult. If you let go of the idea that you SHOULD be able to swim the same pace for a 500 as you do for a 50, you'll be happier in the pool and able to put together much more interesting sets. Here are some projected paces for you based on the two times you gave...assuming those are "PR" times. (the formatting might get ruined but you can copy/paste and add 'tabs' to get the columns back. So if you want to train to improve your fitness in the pool, use your current fitness level to create smart training sets, exactly the way we do with running & biking. Let's just take an 800 yd time as a target because that's good ballpark for a sprint. Based on your two times you shared, in theory right now you should be able to siwm an 800 in 16:26, or 2:03/100. I know your first reaction is going to be "that's too slow" (I know because it was mine the first time I did this kind of analysis for a mile, HIM & IM swim times). But the reality is that is where you are at today and that's the current fitness you have to build on. This is what I would suggest. Create swim sets that add up to about 800-1000 yards. Break it into intervals, but swim the intervals at this 800 yard pace with very short rest. Examples: 15 x 50, targeting 60-62 seconds per 50, rest 10 seconds. (total 750 yards @ your 800 yard pace) Do this as a test set and see if you can do it. If you can, add repeats or decrease rest the next time (don't increase your pace). 8 x 100 targeting 2:03/100, rest 10 seconds (total 800 yards @ your 800 yard pace). or do some over distance sets 5 x 200 @ 4:05-4:06, leave every 2:30 (that would give you 25 seconds between 200s...feel free to decrease the rest if needed). These types of sets will help your body build the aerobic endurance you'll need by allowing you to complete sets ata sustainable pace, within a challenging set of times that you 'should' be able to currently do. Given your time constraints, I'd create about 20-30 minutes of swimming using these patterns. Spend another 15-20 minutes doing drills from your workshop that target your known weak points in your swim Spend maybe 5-10 minutes doing some swimming at a faster pace for fun and variet as well as to build up some fast twitch. Examples: 6- 8x25 on 30 seconds @ your best 100 pace. From the table below, 26 seconds per 25. 6-8 x 50 @ your 200 pace, or 55 seconds each 50. Leave every minute. The most important thing is to base today's training off of todays fitness. IN a few weeks you can repeat a time trial for fastest 50s & fastest 500 and see if you've improved. Throughout all of these sets, count your strokes so that you can track at what point your form seems ot be falling apart. Have fun and feel free to PM me if you have questions. For the curious, the equation for these tables is based on a fatigue curve for best times of an individual across 2 different distances. It's essentially Monod's critical power model, except using a 2nd order fit, rather than a linear fit..it's Daniels VDOT or McMillan running tables applied to swimming. Distance Time Pace/100 100 01:45 01:45 200 03:42 01:51 300 05:43 01:54 400 07:48 01:57 500 09:55 01:59 750 15:20 02:03 800 16:26 02:03 1000 20:53 02:05 1500 32:19 02:09 1650 35:48 02:10

 

Update:

 

Since following great advice these last few months, I've felt much smoother in the water and can swim 2m sets of 100 w/10sec rest indifinitely.

Even though my sprint times have improved, I'm concerned that I do not have enough variety in my workouts because anytime I try to swim more then a 100s I always settle on a 30"/lap pace.

I've typically been doing:

10x100 2m

100 breaststroke

5 sets of 100 where the first 50 is fast and the second is slow

Mix of strokes, 50 fly/ 100 back/ 100 breast to use different muscles

8x100 2m

 

I have heard suggestions of doing a pyramid style workout or a decending workout or something according to your % effort.

Can someone explain what these mean and give examples based on time? 

 

Is the next step simply to start working on 100 sets @1:50-55?

Thanks



Edited by LPJmom 2013-03-14 11:54 AM
2013-03-14 7:08 PM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue
Good progress...flip me a pm and I'll give you my email.
2013-03-14 10:20 PM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue
Early on what you need is form work and specific muscular endurance. Form work will come with instruction and more swimming. Muscular endurance only comes with more swimming. Particularly ensuring that you are pulling, literally ripping through the water, almost as hard as you can. This may require you to swim 100's only at first, but eventually you should build to longer sets such as 200-500's. At this point, 100's will be used more for speed and at times, some Vo2 max work.
2013-03-15 12:33 AM
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Subject: RE: keeping pace - over coming swim fatigue
LPJmom - 2013-03-14 10:51 AM

I have heard suggestions of doing a pyramid style workout or a decending workout or something according to your % effort.

Can someone explain what these mean and give examples based on time? 

 

Is the next step simply to start working on 100 sets @1:50-55?

Thanks



YOu can do any of the following to increase the challenge yo place on yourself while swimming:

1) Increase distance of each repeat
2) incrase number of repeats
3) Decrease rest interval
4) Increase tempo
5) Increase stroke length

1 & 2 together will increase your total volume

4 & 5 will both result n a faster pace, assuming its the only variable changing (get a tempo trainer)

3 should be clear enough. (less rest = more stress)


So take your 10 x 100 on 2 minutes

Any of these will be a higher stress level
6 x 150 on 3 minutes (increase repeat length)

12 x 100 on 2 minutes (increase repetitions)

10 x 100 on 1:55 (decrase rest interval)

For variety & interest you can do a pyramid
50, 100, 150, 200, 200, 150, 100, 50 on 2 minute base (this will combine #1 from the list above in a few different ways...still same total distance, 1000 yards)

For variable 4, increase tempo, you'll need to get a tempo trainer and get a baseline first for yoru current ability.

For variable #5, simple start counting your strokes, then see if you can swim the same tempo with 1 less stroke. Or swim 1 second faster with teh same SPL.

Here's one of my favorite sets:
4 x 25
3 x 50
2 x 75
1 x 100

Double it for longer sets and more training
4 x 50
3 x 100
2 x 150
1 x 200 on a 2 minute base as an alterative to 10 x 100

Lots of ideas.

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