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2013-04-26 2:04 PM
in reply to: #4716537

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Subject: RE: vet advice - my cat is really fat

jmcconne - 2013-04-26 2:54 PM You could start calling her fatty, and poking her in the belly. It's worked with other females I've known.

That would explain the claw marks.



2013-04-26 2:05 PM
in reply to: #4716032

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Subject: RE: vet advice - my cat is really fat

 

You could just love her the way she is and stop being so judgmental! I hope you never get fat and she posts on her kitty forum about how fat you are!

 

But seriously, no one can make her change, she has to want to do it for herself. 

2013-04-26 2:40 PM
in reply to: #4716561

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Subject: RE: vet advice - my cat is really fat
Aarondb4 - 2013-04-26 3:05 PM

 

You could just love her the way she is and stop being so judgmental! I hope you never get fat and she posts on her kitty forum about how fat you are!

 

But seriously, no one can make her change, she has to want to do it for herself. 

Is this the start of a 'how many cats does it take to screw in a light bulb joke?'

2013-04-26 3:47 PM
in reply to: #4716454

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Subject: RE: vet advice - my cat is really fat
noelle1230 - 2013-04-26 10:59 AM
BrianRunsPhilly - 2013-04-26 1:47 PM
noelle1230 - 2013-04-26 1:44 PM
BrianRunsPhilly - 2013-04-26 1:35 PM
noelle1230 - 2013-04-26 1:32 PM
BrianRunsPhilly - 2013-04-26 12:43 PM
noelle1230 - 2013-04-26 12:00 PM

Have you had the cat checked by a vet?  I've known several people with cats who have medical issues that have caused weight gain.  I hope that's not the case for you but I'd get her checked out.  Even if nothing's wrong the vet may suggest a different diet for her.

Yes, she's been to the vet, who had a pet nutritionist put her on a diet last year. She's not gaining weight, but she's not losing either. I try to get her to exercise using a laser pointer or toys, but she will only do it for a couple minutes and then watches her brother.

Do you give the cats wet food only?  If so, try switching to dry, something your allergy cat can handle.  Of course they'll both have to get the dry to avoid having to figure out how to separate the meal times which seems almost impossible.

My cat needs to gain weight (he's a kidney cat) and switch from dry to wet does the trick.  Wet is notorious for better weight gain.

Dry only. They won't eat wet food. Oh, I very rarely give them people food. Maybe some liquid from a can of tuna, but that's like once a month.

I think it's really odd that she's eating pretty much the same stuff as the other guy and is that big.  A few pounds I could understand but that is one big kitty (not to say she's not just as beautiful as a smaller cat Smile)

I may be over-thinking it but if it were a human so overweight on a moderate calorie diet with no concrete reason we would search to make sure there isn't a medical reason.  Second opinion perhaps?

 

I've done that. I'm wondering if this is fairly normal in spayed female cats? Do they become more sedentary?

Believe me, she's soft and sweet, and makes a great pillow, but I do want her to stay healthy.

It's not normal with spayed cats.  I've only owned spayed and neutered and weight gain is not something that is just expected.  I would put a little more pressure on the vet.  It took 6 months to figure out my little man had kidney disease and that's a fairly common diagnosis among cats.

I would agree 100% with all of noelle's advise. My cat has always been big. It's part of his breed. I was hoping that he would lose some weight just to keep him healthy and he stayed with a friend for a couple of weeks while we were out of town and lost some weight. I attributed to them having stairs in their apartment and him getting some more exercise. He still lost weight over the next couple of weeks though, and I took him to the vet. He had an abscessed tooth. I attributed the weight loss to that. But a week later, he was still losing weight. I took him to the vet and asked for a blood test. It turns out that he has severe kidney failure and has been at the vet since Wednesday hooked to an IV. He is coming home tomorrow and looking better, but I really wish I had caught this sooner. I will never leave the vet without a blood test again if I suspect there is something really wrong. Something just doesn't seem to be adding up for your cat. 

2013-04-26 6:43 PM
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Subject: RE: vet advice - my cat is really fat

X3 on the vet check. I've had cats that are overweight for reason ranging from thyroid to worms. (In some it can actually change what they absorb and cause them to gain.) Many of the conditions are easily and cheaply treatable. If it all checks out okay, low-cal cat food?? Smudgee loves to snack and was putting on fat as soon as he stopped growing so the vet recommended Royal Canine Fit. Iams and Science Diet make similar stuff. This would probably entail separate feeding, esp. with the brother's allergy issues. Plus measuring food.  Whether or not putting up with the whining that often ensues when the day's ration is done would be your call!

Finally, it may just be her natural body composition. My cat has a brother and sister who live with my colleague. All three siblings (15 months now) are fixed, healthy and active, eat similar diets, and see the same vet (the only Western-trained one in town). Smudgee and his brother are both about 12 pounds, tall and sturdy with a tendency to potbellies, sister is tiny and barely six.

2013-04-27 1:20 PM
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Subject: RE: vet advice - my cat is really fat
Well it looks like she can do at least one sit up, so that's a start.


2013-04-27 1:51 PM
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Subject: RE: vet advice - my cat is really fat
Hot Runner - 2013-04-26 7:43 PM

X3 on the vet check. I've had cats that are overweight for reason ranging from thyroid to worms. (In some it can actually change what they absorb and cause them to gain.) Many of the conditions are easily and cheaply treatable. If it all checks out okay, low-cal cat food?? Smudgee loves to snack and was putting on fat as soon as he stopped growing so the vet recommended Royal Canine Fit. Iams and Science Diet make similar stuff. This would probably entail separate feeding, esp. with the brother's allergy issues. Plus measuring food.  Whether or not putting up with the whining that often ensues when the day's ration is done would be your call!

Finally, it may just be her natural body composition. My cat has a brother and sister who live with my colleague. All three siblings (15 months now) are fixed, healthy and active, eat similar diets, and see the same vet (the only Western-trained one in town). Smudgee and his brother are both about 12 pounds, tall and sturdy with a tendency to potbellies, sister is tiny and barely six.

She's due for shots so I will take her to the vet and ask again. She certainly seems quite healthy. Honestly I think shes just a lazy girl and needs less calories that the nutritionist calculated. She never cries for food or begs.

There is something pleasant about a big cat curled up against you. I did a hard 3 hour ride this morning and am about to take a little cat nap

2013-04-27 2:25 PM
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Subject: RE: vet advice - my cat is really fat
BrianRunsPhilly - 2013-04-26 12:43 PM
noelle1230 - 2013-04-26 12:00 PM

Have you had the cat checked by a vet?  I've known several people with cats who have medical issues that have caused weight gain.  I hope that's not the case for you but I'd get her checked out.  Even if nothing's wrong the vet may suggest a different diet for her.

Yes, she's been to the vet, who had a pet nutritionist put her on a diet last year. She's not gaining weight, but she's not losing either. I try to get her to exercise using a laser pointer or toys, but she will only do it for a couple minutes and then watches her brother.

I don't know why but that job description sounds sooooo funny to me!!!! I'm invisioning your kitty going to her meetings with the pet nutritionist and having weekly weigh ins.

Nutritionist "Your up a pound."

Cat: "Bummer. I knew i shouldn't have eaten that extra serving of Fancy Feast."

I know nothing about pet nutrition, but that is a cute cat and reminds me of "Puss n Boots" from Shrek 3. 



Edited by KateTri1 2013-04-27 2:25 PM
2013-04-29 12:31 AM
in reply to: #4716032

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Subject: RE: vet advice - my cat is really fat

Jen - I had no idea that Kitty was sick!  Is he still diabetic too??

And in terms of wet vs dry - the "dry only cuz wet makes them gain weight" isn't really true, it depends on the balance of carbs, proteins & fats in the food.  Cats are obligate carnivores and don't handle carbs well for energy.  Fat gets stored in the liver as well as in the regular places.  Very unhealthy.

It's possible that the cat with kidney disease gained weight on wet food because he liked it more, ate more, and could better digest it.  Also he would stay better hydrated on wet food and therefore felt better and continued to do best on it.

Take any diet - 1 cup of the dry version & 1 cup of the wet version.  The dry food is more concentrated in calories, with only approx 10% moisture whereas the wet will have upwards of 80% moisture.  So a cat can eat more volume of wet food and consume fewer calories, feeling more satisfied.  And because wet food is always lower in carbs it will be better. 

Even the "grain free" kibbles still have carbs.  Without starch, when you open the bag all you'd get is a bag of powder.  The starch keeps the kibbles in the nice people-pleasing shapes.

There are hypoallergenic canned foods available.  Not as economical as feeding dry, but diabetes & hepatic lipidosis can be verrrrrry expensive to treat.

But, at the end of the day, every body is different in terms of metabolism.  Exercise is important too - the suggestion to move the food around to simulate hunting is an excellent one.

 

PS. We know for sure the male is ok right?  not hyperthyroid (would make him eat more to maintain same weight)? Hyperthyroid is way more common in cats than hypothyroid.

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