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2013-05-19 5:27 PM
in reply to: respro

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Subject: RE: They don't get me.

  • ..and this is why the heavens have granted us Tri Clubs. So we can nerd out with people who don't necessarily blink an when we talk gear, rashes, race planning or gutting out a bad race for a finish. I might was well have grown a third eye and pink hair to most folks, family, friends, etc. They are supportive without a doubt, but understanding and being able to talk to them is simply not possible.

  • There is an old joke - how do you know if someone is an Ironman? They will tell you.

    This sport is a bit of an obsession and that's okay. I hope you stick with it and end up loving it. You are doing something that 'outsiders' simply do not understand but if you like it, you'll end up wrapping yourself in it like a blanket. Perhaps you will know when you are wondering if you can squeeze a race in during your next vacation.

    Dream big.

    best,
    t


    2013-05-19 6:07 PM
    in reply to: TheClaaaw

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    Subject: RE: They don't get me.
    Originally posted by TheClaaaw

    I'm going to say something dickish and elitist which has nothing to do with triathlon. Deciding to take up triathlon is nothing special, but I love it and it may be part of saving my life.

    The thing is, if my reading of society is even 20% accurate, then the last thing you want is to have everyone nod in agreement that you're doing something sensible. I mean, it seems that what is popular, accepted as the norm, the good life, is more and more based on lack of exertion, unappreciate criticism and consumption of others' creativity, obsession with the worst of humanity glorified in "reality" tv, defining yourself by a ridiculously expensive vehicle, buying jewelry and clothes that some magazine told us to, watching cooking shows but never actually cooking real food, twittering about celebrity gossip, and spending hours online to find the best price on cruises where you can do nothing but eat and eat and drink and drink and eat and eat.

    Endurance sports, in and of themselves, are not necessarily always a better way to spend one's time and money, but they have helped to focus me in the direction I always craved: be a do-er, not just a watcher.

    In other words, screw what the majority thinks. The majority think that artistic talent is discovered on American Idol. the majority recognizes any random Kardashian more readily than the Secretary of State. The majority are self-made idiots who ask nothing of themselves, but demand the world to entertain them instantly all the time, so long as that entertainment is brain-mushing lowest-common-denominator crap that reinforces their own uninformed prejudices. In the words of Louis CK, non-contributing product sponge ****s.

    I'm really not misanthropic or anti-America or anything. But when hear anyone beat down by the race to medicrioty as if doing something for yourself not dictated by fast-food advertising, makes YOU ithe weird one, I get reactionary. You know what's weird? Sitting on a couch drinking sugar water in a bottle labeled Gatorade, while watching some other person bounce a ball on a screen. That's weird. Screw em. Get out there and move. Just don't expect anyone at the office to care. When you exhibit being a happier and healthier person and someone asks what's different, then tell them. Or do what all 40ish overweight people are required to do. Start a blog and write as if anyone else actually cares. Weird thing is, eventually someone will. Someone who gets it, and wants in on the conversation. That's been my experience anyway.



    I have nothing more to add. Great post Claaw!
    2013-05-19 6:36 PM
    in reply to: 0

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    Subject: RE: They don't get me.
    There are a few who don't understand, but it doesn't bother me. My husband and kids get me and that's all that matters.

    Edited by Blanda 2013-05-19 6:42 PM
    2013-05-19 6:57 PM
    in reply to: respro

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    Subject: RE: They don't get me.
    I did my first tri when I was 48 and I'll be 55 tomorrow. I just set my Oly PR yesterday.
    2013-05-19 8:18 PM
    in reply to: respro

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    Subject: RE: They don't get me.
    Four years ago I stepped on the scale - 190 lbs, double chin, and a gut. I started running and doing the Insanity workout (prior to running - I thought it was pointless unless there was a ball to be used while doing it or a way to score). I lost 30 lbs through the summer. I felt really good about myself - and my wife mentioned, that maybe I should try a 5k.

    The seed was planted. Up until her mentioning that I had never even considered a race and was only running about 2 miles - 4 times a week. So I started training and that fall I ran my first race and took 3rd. I thought it was AWESOME - a new form of competition. From that race I have done quite a few 5ks, a couple 10k's, a half marathon.

    My brother-in-law is the one who did triathlons, went to watch him at IMKS70.3 (which I really wasn't interested in), but ANOTHER seed was planted as I watched people way older than me out there swimming, biking, and running. A year later I did two sprint tri's and FELL.IN.LOVE! I love the training, the discipline, the competition. The people are all great within the sport and the forums.

    After my ACL injury late last summer (at age 34) I have given up basketball to focus on triathlon (and golf) as my to sports to take part in. I am in rural Kansas with few people who share my passion. It's great when you can finally get around people who think and feel the way you about health and exercise. I have a wife and kids that are supportive, but out of all the people I work with - I'm the only one who's the exercise guy. And that's just fine with me as I like being the different one.
    2013-05-19 8:34 PM
    in reply to: respro

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    Subject: RE: They don't get me.
    Stop worrying about it. It is probably equal parts A) they don't get it and B) you are a new devotee of a sport and talk about it way too much.

    Neither are bad; both are common. Just go and do your thing.


    2013-05-19 9:47 PM
    in reply to: respro

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    Subject: RE: They don't get me.
    A few years ago I found myself married to my college sweetheart with a two year old son, I drove a Mercedes, had a big house in the suburbs with picket fence and a big TV which I watched a lot. In other words I was living the American dream. I was absolutely miserable. I was working my butt off in a job that was going no where career wise, was out of shape and 40 lbs overweight, in debt, no hobbies, my marriage was falling apart and I did not see a way to fix it. I was not 29 yet. I had been an cyclist and boy scout who loved the outdoors in high school and now I found myself never doing any of that. I felt that something the way I was living was wrong and I felt lost.
    I decided to get in shape after my older brother called me fat. I started lifting weights and jogging on the treadmill at the gym. I sought personal and family counseling at the encouragement of family. One week the counselor told me I needed a personal challenge and a hobby to make me happy. The next week I came back and told him I had signed up for a sprint triathlon because I had seen a rebroadcast of Ironman Kona on NBC at 1 am as I was trying to sleep on the couch. He smiled and then told me I was crazy, my wife told me I was crazy, my brother told me I was awesome and put a new pair of running shoes in the mail.
    Today I live in a small house, don't own a TV, drive a used Subaru, am debt free, have dropped 35 lbs and am really really happy. I have made great friends through running and triathlon and met my girlfriend through it. My ex wife doesn't get it, my coworkers don't get it. They think it is weird I don't watch TV and I workout a lot. I have a great relationship with my son, who talks about how he loves to watch me race and took my HIM finishers medal for show and tell at school. His teacher told me how great an example I am setting for him. I have been making progress at work. Last fall I had scheduled off at work for a few days during a busy time and when my boss's boss's boss asked me about it, I told her how I was traveling to run a marathon in DC. The next week I found myself having lunch with her and a few other upper managers and talking about running, then a few weeks after that I got a promotion.

    Be weird, live your own life, take care of yourself, stop caring what others think and you will be surprised what happens and what you can make happen. I think you are doing awesome!
    2013-05-19 10:32 PM
    in reply to: bikeday


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    Subject: RE: They don't get me.
    Apparently triathletes are a class act lot, judging from the replies so far. Hopefully I will meet many of you on a course in the future.
    2013-05-19 10:32 PM
    in reply to: bikeday

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    Subject: RE: They don't get me.
    Originally posted by bikeday

    A few years ago I found myself married to my college sweetheart with a two year old son, I drove a Mercedes, had a big house in the suburbs with picket fence and a big TV which I watched a lot. In other words I was living the American dream. I was absolutely miserable. I was working my butt off in a job that was going no where career wise, was out of shape and 40 lbs overweight, in debt, no hobbies, my marriage was falling apart and I did not see a way to fix it. I was not 29 yet. I had been an cyclist and boy scout who loved the outdoors in high school and now I found myself never doing any of that. I felt that something the way I was living was wrong and I felt lost.
    I decided to get in shape after my older brother called me fat. I started lifting weights and jogging on the treadmill at the gym. I sought personal and family counseling at the encouragement of family. One week the counselor told me I needed a personal challenge and a hobby to make me happy. The next week I came back and told him I had signed up for a sprint triathlon because I had seen a rebroadcast of Ironman Kona on NBC at 1 am as I was trying to sleep on the couch. He smiled and then told me I was crazy, my wife told me I was crazy, my brother told me I was awesome and put a new pair of running shoes in the mail.
    Today I live in a small house, don't own a TV, drive a used Subaru, am debt free, have dropped 35 lbs and am really really happy. I have made great friends through running and triathlon and met my girlfriend through it. My ex wife doesn't get it, my coworkers don't get it. They think it is weird I don't watch TV and I workout a lot. I have a great relationship with my son, who talks about how he loves to watch me race and took my HIM finishers medal for show and tell at school. His teacher told me how great an example I am setting for him. I have been making progress at work. Last fall I had scheduled off at work for a few days during a busy time and when my boss's boss's boss asked me about it, I told her how I was traveling to run a marathon in DC. The next week I found myself having lunch with her and a few other upper managers and talking about running, then a few weeks after that I got a promotion.

    Be weird, live your own life, take care of yourself, stop caring what others think and you will be surprised what happens and what you can make happen. I think you are doing awesome!

    Post of the year. Thank you for putting this out there in the world.

    2013-05-20 9:51 PM
    in reply to: bikeday

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    Subject: RE: They don't get me.
    Originally posted by bikeday

    A few years ago I found myself married to my college sweetheart with a two year old son, I drove a Mercedes, had a big house in the suburbs with picket fence and a big TV which I watched a lot. In other words I was living the American dream. I was absolutely miserable. I was working my butt off in a job that was going no where career wise, was out of shape and 40 lbs overweight, in debt, no hobbies, my marriage was falling apart and I did not see a way to fix it. I was not 29 yet. I had been an cyclist and boy scout who loved the outdoors in high school and now I found myself never doing any of that. I felt that something the way I was living was wrong and I felt lost.
    I decided to get in shape after my older brother called me fat. I started lifting weights and jogging on the treadmill at the gym. I sought personal and family counseling at the encouragement of family. One week the counselor told me I needed a personal challenge and a hobby to make me happy. The next week I came back and told him I had signed up for a sprint triathlon because I had seen a rebroadcast of Ironman Kona on NBC at 1 am as I was trying to sleep on the couch. He smiled and then told me I was crazy, my wife told me I was crazy, my brother told me I was awesome and put a new pair of running shoes in the mail.
    Today I live in a small house, don't own a TV, drive a used Subaru, am debt free, have dropped 35 lbs and am really really happy. I have made great friends through running and triathlon and met my girlfriend through it. My ex wife doesn't get it, my coworkers don't get it. They think it is weird I don't watch TV and I workout a lot. I have a great relationship with my son, who talks about how he loves to watch me race and took my HIM finishers medal for show and tell at school. His teacher told me how great an example I am setting for him. I have been making progress at work. Last fall I had scheduled off at work for a few days during a busy time and when my boss's boss's boss asked me about it, I told her how I was traveling to run a marathon in DC. The next week I found myself having lunch with her and a few other upper managers and talking about running, then a few weeks after that I got a promotion.



    This is a great story - congratulations on your accomplishments!
    2013-05-21 7:46 AM
    in reply to: TheClaaaw

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    Subject: RE: They don't get me.
    Originally posted by DannyII

    Most people are already dead. They don't do anything, nor do they want to do anything. They are just waiting for the end.




    This made me chuckle. So true.

    Originally posted by TheClaaaw

    I'm going to say something dickish and elitist which has nothing to do with triathlon. Deciding to take up triathlon is nothing special, but I love it and it may be part of saving my life.

    The thing is, if my reading of society is even 20% accurate, then the last thing you want is to have everyone nod in agreement that you're doing something sensible. I mean, it seems that what is popular, accepted as the norm, the good life, is more and more based on lack of exertion, unappreciate criticism and consumption of others' creativity, obsession with the worst of humanity glorified in "reality" tv, defining yourself by a ridiculously expensive vehicle, buying jewelry and clothes that some magazine told us to, watching cooking shows but never actually cooking real food, twittering about celebrity gossip, and spending hours online to find the best price on cruises where you can do nothing but eat and eat and drink and drink and eat and eat.

    Endurance sports, in and of themselves, are not necessarily always a better way to spend one's time and money, but they have helped to focus me in the direction I always craved: be a do-er, not just a watcher.

    In other words, screw what the majority thinks. The majority think that artistic talent is discovered on American Idol. the majority recognizes any random Kardashian more readily than the Secretary of State. The majority are self-made idiots who ask nothing of themselves, but demand the world to entertain them instantly all the time, so long as that entertainment is brain-mushing lowest-common-denominator crap that reinforces their own uninformed prejudices. In the words of Louis CK, non-contributing product sponge ****s.

    I'm really not misanthropic or anti-America or anything. But when hear anyone beat down by the race to medicrioty as if doing something for yourself not dictated by fast-food advertising, makes YOU ithe weird one, I get reactionary. You know what's weird? Sitting on a couch drinking sugar water in a bottle labeled Gatorade, while watching some other person bounce a ball on a screen. That's weird. Screw em. Get out there and move. Just don't expect anyone at the office to care. When you exhibit being a happier and healthier person and someone asks what's different, then tell them. Or do what all 40ish overweight people are required to do. Start a blog and write as if anyone else actually cares. Weird thing is, eventually someone will. Someone who gets it, and wants in on the conversation. That's been my experience anyway.



    Great post Claw. You just have to hope that some of those who don't get will catch on, embrace healthy living and find out what they've been missing.


    2013-05-21 8:28 AM
    in reply to: respro

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    Subject: RE: They don't get me.
    Originally posted by respro

    Family, friends and coworkers don't seem to understand my desire to start doing tris. This, especially as I limp around with a knee injury. Too old is what the common consensus is in not those exact words. I'm 42 and over weight. Joined the gym, putting miles on the bike and starting to run as I ramp up the training. It doesn't bother me that people don't seem to understand. I just wonder if others experience these reactions. I'm wondering if our desire and commitment is that different and "foreign" to most other folks.


    Keep at it. When you're 43 with your weight in check and still doing triathlons you won't seem too old.
    2013-05-21 8:33 AM
    in reply to: bikeday

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    Subject: RE: They don't get me.
    Originally posted by bikeday

    I have a great relationship with my son, who talks about how he loves to watch me race and took my HIM finishers medal for show and tell at school. His teacher told me how great an example I am setting for him.



    Enough said. I do everything that I do for my family........... EVERYTHING. I recently posted about my own experience starting to train for triathlons a few months ago and my 15 year old daughter who sits on her phone and Ipod all day on the couch started asking me about my training and race and turns out she started running a few weeks ago and she really enjoys it. What an awesome feeling it was for me to see her be inspired by me. I have actually been lucky to have a tremendous amount of support from my family and friends though. They all think its awesome what I am doing.

    The only time I think I got the red flag for what I do is when I first started to learn to swim and I put on my Speedo Jammers, nose plug, goggles and snorkel and walked out of my bedroom and into the living room where my wife and kids were. The reactions on their faces were priceless. My wife gave me the look of "please don't let ANYBODY that I know see you like this". But besides that, its been 100% positive support for me.

    All I can tell the OP is that if you are happy doing what you are doing and your training is not effecting your home life, i.e. spouse / kids in a negative way, go ahead and knock yourself out. Good Luck and have fun
    2013-05-21 8:33 AM
    in reply to: bikeday

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    Subject: RE: They don't get me.
    Originally posted by bikeday

    A few years ago I found myself married to my college sweetheart with a two year old son, I drove a Mercedes, had a big house in the suburbs with picket fence and a big TV which I watched a lot. In other words I was living the American dream. I was absolutely miserable. I was working my butt off in a job that was going no where career wise, was out of shape and 40 lbs overweight, in debt, no hobbies, my marriage was falling apart and I did not see a way to fix it. I was not 29 yet. I had been an cyclist and boy scout who loved the outdoors in high school and now I found myself never doing any of that. I felt that something the way I was living was wrong and I felt lost.
    I decided to get in shape after my older brother called me fat. I started lifting weights and jogging on the treadmill at the gym. I sought personal and family counseling at the encouragement of family. One week the counselor told me I needed a personal challenge and a hobby to make me happy. The next week I came back and told him I had signed up for a sprint triathlon because I had seen a rebroadcast of Ironman Kona on NBC at 1 am as I was trying to sleep on the couch. He smiled and then told me I was crazy, my wife told me I was crazy, my brother told me I was awesome and put a new pair of running shoes in the mail.
    Today I live in a small house, don't own a TV, drive a used Subaru, am debt free, have dropped 35 lbs and am really really happy. I have made great friends through running and triathlon and met my girlfriend through it. My ex wife doesn't get it, my coworkers don't get it. They think it is weird I don't watch TV and I workout a lot. I have a great relationship with my son, who talks about how he loves to watch me race and took my HIM finishers medal for show and tell at school. His teacher told me how great an example I am setting for him. I have been making progress at work. Last fall I had scheduled off at work for a few days during a busy time and when my boss's boss's boss asked me about it, I told her how I was traveling to run a marathon in DC. The next week I found myself having lunch with her and a few other upper managers and talking about running, then a few weeks after that I got a promotion.

    Be weird, live your own life, take care of yourself, stop caring what others think and you will be surprised what happens and what you can make happen. I think you are doing awesome!

    Awesome post....

    I agree with the general spirit of this thread... don't let those that don't get you... drag you down. You're doing something healthy and positive... carry on!
    2013-05-21 8:59 AM
    in reply to: respro

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    Subject: RE: They don't get me.
    Originally posted by respro

    Family, friends and coworkers don't seem to understand my desire to start doing tris. This, especially as I limp around with a knee injury. Too old is what the common consensus is in not those exact words. I'm 42 and over weight. Joined the gym, putting miles on the bike and starting to run as I ramp up the training. It doesn't bother me that people don't seem to understand. I just wonder if others experience these reactions. I'm wondering if our desire and commitment is that different and "foreign" to most other folks.


    I also vote to ignore them, or screw them as someone here put it already. It's your life, enjoy it - and if that mean taking up triathlons, good for you. You'll be in much better shape for it. And we're probably all in the same boat as you...few of our relatives/friends/co-workers really understand the desire to race tris. It's their loss.

    As for the too old argument, blah blah blah. Ask them how many prescription pills they're popping today. Most folks would rather sit on their couch, pop a boatload of pills and hope that medical science can cure their ills.

    Keep your head up, we're all in this together.

    2013-05-21 2:49 PM
    in reply to: LarchmontTri


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    Subject: RE: They don't get me.
    In April 2004, my truck got rear-ended. Best decision I ever made in life was to skip fixing cosmetic damage to a battered pickup and buy a bike. My goal at 400+ lbs. was to bike a marathon in six months. I found a flat, shady trail I liked and would hit it after work at least 3 days a week. In October 2004, I did 26.2 and 30 miles on consecutive weekends. I started by doing six miles at a time and gradually worked that up into the "longer" distances.

    In December 2011, I was down 90 lbs. and saw that my gym was running two indoor triathlons a month during the winter. I figured I could do the bike, I'd been doing walk/jog intervals on the indoor track, so if I could swim, I could do that. Worst-case scenario, I get off the treadmill, walk out to the truck, and go home. I went to the event and found that there weren't enough bikes for everyone, so I ended up in a second heat of just myself. I did the backstroke for six laps, rode a spincycle for 10 miles, and walked 3 miles on the treadmill with about 20% running. The race director told me he didn't care if he had to stay for six hours, that I was tough, and he was going to see me finish.

    A few months later I finished my first outdoor triathlon. The race shirts weren't even available in a size that would fit me, but my sweet wife gave me a cotton T-shirt she'd decorated herself with fabric markers, reading "Veni, Vidi, Vici", and some swim/bike/run stick figures. A race later in the year actually had shirts in my size, and I rode a century ride in November. I made an additional goal of running all the indoor races at the gym this past winter, and to do nothing but the long courses - 500 yds/15 miles/5 miles. At my last race, I did the 5 mile run with no walking at all.

    For this year, I'm signed up for four triathlons, including 2 Olympic distances. One is 1200 miles away, near where I grew up, and my mom couldn't be more excited. My teenage daughter, who has some serious weight issues herself, is training with me to walk a 5K, a 4 mile, and a Warrior Dash this year. I just hope that I can help her avoid some of the problems I've had. As I tell her, the race does nothing for you at all - but training for the race will improve your health and your life. I'm down 140 lbs. At work, we joke that I've lost a full accountant.


    2013-05-21 2:58 PM
    in reply to: fisherman76

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    Subject: RE: They don't get me.
    I go through this almost on a daily basis at work. Or at least I used too. When I first started training again early last year I started to lose weight and it showed eventually. Let me put it to you this way. Have you ever been asked if you had Aids? I was...more as a joke than anything else but hey...I work in a steel mill and it's the little stupid things there that all keep us somewhat sane while we work our butts off. As far as the training and the race distances I do they all think I am a nut case for doing even a 5k really. There are a few people at work who also do some races and such but it's mostly running and maybe some people there that do stuff like a warrior dash as well.

    Either way I don't let it bother me and after my weekends off I get asked if I biked a 1000 miles or something and when I say, "no only 80 miles and that was the day after I ran 19." They are still amazed.
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