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2013-10-03 3:14 PM
in reply to: trigal38

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool

 

Originally posted by trigal38

Originally posted by switch Just for the record, being homeschooled doesn't mean you're not around other kids.  It's a common misconception.

Just to clarify from my perspective I just meant that she looks forward to being around all her friends all the time if that makes sense. Our area has a very big home school group with lots of social activities planned at the library, field trips, and sports at the Y which I'm actually going to help teach starting next week.

  Ahhh, my comment was directed to Goosedog and Moondawg14--those, dogs, they're trouble. 

It totally makes sense that your daughter looks forward to spending the day with her friends:)

It's great that your community has a very active homeschool group.  I think these are great resources if you decide to go that route.  As Joe said, there are lots of opportunities for kids to socialize when they're homeschooled, often across many ages, and even generations, which, once we get out of school, is the norm for social interactions.

I applaud you for thinking about all of your options.  Even if you decide that staying in public school is the best thing for your daughter and family, the important thing is that you're thinking it through and not just taking the school's edict or the path of least resistance.  Sometimes just processing it is the best step :)



2013-10-03 3:18 PM
in reply to: aponi

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool

Originally posted by aponi My sister homeschooled her three kids. They're grown now and they are all of them weird. I'm sorry but its true. Now in her case they homeschooled because they are way way religious and were trying to protect their kids from something called secular humanism which I think means "anything fun that involves other children". On the other hand, I had a friend in high school whose sister was being homeschooled because she was a violin prodigy. She was a little uncomfortable around kids her own age too though. I'm not helping here I realize it. She seems awfully young to get slapped with a label.

This is my biggest problem - that kindergarten age children are taking a timed 1 min test and then directly compared to their peers in class for placement in Title 1. It's not a national average, it is the average of her class. Well the trend around here is to hold (especially boys) back from beginning Kindergarten until they are 6. My daughter has a spring birthday so she is one of the youngest. My husband was trying to explain it to me by telling me it's not a big deal, it's just extra help, someone had to be at the bottom 25th percentile. It is a way of catching any areas the children may need extra help in early. But according to her teacher her work is all on track in the classroom. So she is on track unless you time her for 1 minute and compare her to all her friends - whatever.

I don't mind her getting extra help. She will enjoy the extra attention - I know she will. It's just a symptom of the system that has moved so far away from understanding what I feel is developmentally appropriate.

And I will get off my soap box about that .

For now I have decided to set up a time to go observe her at school and then get serious with her teacher at conference time. By serious I mean I don't want to hear a bunch of fluff from teacher, give it to me straight.

2013-10-03 5:40 PM
in reply to: trigal38

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool
Originally posted by trigal38

Originally posted by aponi My sister homeschooled her three kids. They're grown now and they are all of them weird. I'm sorry but its true. Now in her case they homeschooled because they are way way religious and were trying to protect their kids from something called secular humanism which I think means "anything fun that involves other children". On the other hand, I had a friend in high school whose sister was being homeschooled because she was a violin prodigy. She was a little uncomfortable around kids her own age too though. I'm not helping here I realize it. She seems awfully young to get slapped with a label.

This is my biggest problem - that kindergarten age children are taking a timed 1 min test and then directly compared to their peers in class for placement in Title 1. It's not a national average, it is the average of her class. Well the trend around here is to hold (especially boys) back from beginning Kindergarten until they are 6. My daughter has a spring birthday so she is one of the youngest. My husband was trying to explain it to me by telling me it's not a big deal, it's just extra help, someone had to be at the bottom 25th percentile. It is a way of catching any areas the children may need extra help in early. But according to her teacher her work is all on track in the classroom. So she is on track unless you time her for 1 minute and compare her to all her friends - whatever.

I don't mind her getting extra help. She will enjoy the extra attention - I know she will. It's just a symptom of the system that has moved so far away from understanding what I feel is developmentally appropriate.

And I will get off my soap box about that .

For now I have decided to set up a time to go observe her at school and then get serious with her teacher at conference time. By serious I mean I don't want to hear a bunch of fluff from teacher, give it to me straight.


I wouldn't worry about Kindergartener qualifying for RTI or Title 1 or whatever your state calls it.  It's not about labels, it's about data.  It is great to have a baseline of where your daughter is at and use that to see her progress or regression.  You need data in order to know if your child is learning and progressing.   I'm sure you would rather know in K if your child is struggling as opposed to her getting older and falling behind.  I say this as a parent of a child who flew under the radar for years and is now in 5th grade but reads at a 2nd grade level.  The earlier you can get intervention the better.

As far as homeschooling goes, I'd wait a quarter and see how you feel and how you feel about. 
2013-10-03 6:38 PM
in reply to: trigal38

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool
Originally posted by trigal38

And wondering how do you know? My daughter is 5, just started kindergarten. She has already been tagged for Title 1 services for math. I did not see or hear one report from her teacher up to this point that she has been having any trouble. I just received a generic form letter from the Principal. I sent her teacher an email asking what she had trouble with on the test. Teacher responded that all of her class work is fine. The test the kids took was timed and my daughter was just a little slower answering the questions than the other kids in her class. She also commented that my daughter sometimes loses focus but once she is reminded she will stay on track. We see this same thing at home.

 

A traditional public school education just does not feel right to me for her. I am a certified teacher and currently a stay at home mom. I can do this myself. She won't have the distractions of 20 other kids in her class, she will get one on one and more opportunities for hands on learning. I've been in the classroom with 20 kids, I know first hand how much time is wasted correcting behaviors. I know kids do not all learn the same way. The only papers I see come home are worksheets and color papers. There are so many other ways to learn than sitting at a table coloring a worksheet.

But, I realize I am emotional at the moment and don't want to make any rash decisions. It's not exactly comforting to hear your 5 year old is already behind in the 1st quarter of Kindergarten! We have the added complication of my husband being the Superintendent. Right now she goes to work with Daddy a couple of times a week, she would miss out on that. And I worry about the social aspect. I think she would miss being around all the other children.

I don't know, raising kids is complicated.

Love to hear your experiences.

I always have mixed feeling on this subject because it depends on so many things and the individuals in play (parents and kids).  My stock answer is it really depends on the parents and the motives.  There's no question that kids have awesome experiences and educations from home schooling and there are the same in the public schools.  There are also kids that get really jacked up via home schooling and also in the public schools.  IMHO, the jacked up kids have jacked up parents no matter where they go to school.  So they're pretty much destined to be jacked no matter where they go to school.  

Another factor are the schools that your kids are going to go into if they go to public schools.  We are fortunate that we live in one of the best school districts in our state and I wouldn't even fathom doing anything other than having our kids in public school because I don't think there's a chance my wife or I could give them a better education.  I even think the public schools are better than any of the private schools around here.

An example I give of the wrong motive some parents have is from a cousin of mine.  She was a very protective single mother that wanted to shelter her son.  She wouldn't let him play with any other kids or leave the yard.  He was home schooled because she wanted to protect him from the "scary" world.
Fast forward and he goes off to college.  Within 2 months he was kicked out of school, gets hooked on who knows how many drugs and went to jail for several years on drug charges.
His dilemma had nothing to do with "home schooling" his was because he had a jacked up mom who wanted to "protect" him from the world.  In her desire to protect, she did nothing but harm.  He's still a mess and he's 35 years old now.

My daughter was put into "special ed" classes early in elementary school and it ticked me off and I didn't like it at all.  She didn't like it either and even bugged her mom to home school her.  My wife considered it, but we ultimately told her to suck it up cupcake and worked with her more at home in the evenings.
She's in High School now and is in several advanced classes and gets straight A's.  She's planning to be a Veterinarian and I don't have a worry in the world about her. 

So, my advice would be to not do it based on a reaction of an event in school like this.  I would let the year pan out and make a decision as a family at the end of the year.  It's a big commitment and if you're a good parent, which I think you are, you're kid will be just fine no matter what you decide.  

2013-10-03 7:25 PM
in reply to: switch

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool
Originally posted by switch

 

Originally posted by trigal38

Originally posted by switch Just for the record, being homeschooled doesn't mean you're not around other kids.  It's a common misconception.

Just to clarify from my perspective I just meant that she looks forward to being around all her friends all the time if that makes sense. Our area has a very big home school group with lots of social activities planned at the library, field trips, and sports at the Y which I'm actually going to help teach starting next week.

  Ahhh, my comment was directed to Goosedog and Moondawg14--those, dogs, they're trouble. 

It totally makes sense that your daughter looks forward to spending the day with her friends

It's great that your community has a very active homeschool group.  I think these are great resources if you decide to go that route.  As Joe said, there are lots of opportunities for kids to socialize when they're homeschooled, often across many ages, and even generations, which, once we get out of school, is the norm for social interactions.

I applaud you for thinking about all of your options.  Even if you decide that staying in public school is the best thing for your daughter and family, the important thing is that you're thinking it through and not just taking the school's edict or the path of least resistance.  Sometimes just processing it is the best step

Ahem.  I'm a dawg, not a dog, thankyouverymuch! 

And I didn't in any way mean to imply that homeschooling per se would turn anyone's kid into a awkward loner.  I have several friends that homeschool, most of them use some sort of cooperative, the kids are totally cool.   IIRC, trigal has only one or 2 kids, which could lead to a nice, quiet place devoid of distractions... but with more "challenges" from a social perspective. 

I am 100% in support of anyone who decides to homeschool.  I was just saying "Don't jump into it."

2013-10-03 9:26 PM
in reply to: switch

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool

Originally posted by switch Just for the record, being homeschooled doesn't mean you're not around other kids.  It's a common misconception.

Correct!

As an example, there is a homeschooled kid on my son's 9th grade football team.  



2013-10-03 9:57 PM
in reply to: trigal38

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool
Hey there,

I have been homeschooling my daughters now 11, 10 and 6 from the beginning.
We sent our two boys to public school, both graduated having done well throughout one of them mostly honors classes.
They were very ill prepared for college.
Here in Texas teaching to the test is the most important thing to schools.
Teachers hands are tied and it makes them crazy.
In my experience if you put 10 homeschooling parents in a room at least 5 of them were teachers.

Please plug yourself in, there are options.
My daughters go to a school for homeschoolers, weird right? They go one day a week 9:15 (sleep is important) to 2:45. At school they take Creative Writing, Science, Spanish, Art and P.E. where they get to play dodgeball!!!!!
They get homework we work on at home.
The writing class is history based so they learn and remember history more than kids who are taught only about wars in school.
One of my daughters needs to learn math a few different ways so we chose Math U See because they use a DVD, workbook, textbook and small blocks the girls can build and solve problems.

They take a tennis & gymnastics for homeschoolers and are on a club cross country team. They were in a homeschool girl scout troop until this year when they decided to take a break.
We were part of a coop for years where the girls took classes of their choosing.
Here in Houston the history museum, science museum and zoo have special programs for homeschoolers.
The YMCA also offers P.E. and other classes.

My girls are much more social and outgoing than most public schooled kids. I got in trouble for this statement on this board a few years ago. So I will add 'in my experience'. I was there when my boys got off the bus and there were kids who never talked to anybody all day long. Being in a room with 25-35 kids the same age as you 8 hours a day does not = socialization in my opinion.

2013-10-04 6:30 AM
in reply to: KeriKadi

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool

Originally posted by KeriKadi Hey there, I have been homeschooling my daughters now 11, 10 and 6 from the beginning. We sent our two boys to public school, both graduated having done well throughout one of them mostly honors classes. They were very ill prepared for college. Here in Texas teaching to the test is the most important thing to schools. Teachers hands are tied and it makes them crazy. In my experience if you put 10 homeschooling parents in a room at least 5 of them were teachers. Please plug yourself in, there are options. My daughters go to a school for homeschoolers, weird right? They go one day a week 9:15 (sleep is important) to 2:45. At school they take Creative Writing, Science, Spanish, Art and P.E. where they get to play dodgeball!!!!! They get homework we work on at home. The writing class is history based so they learn and remember history more than kids who are taught only about wars in school. One of my daughters needs to learn math a few different ways so we chose Math U See because they use a DVD, workbook, textbook and small blocks the girls can build and solve problems. They take a tennis & gymnastics for homeschoolers and are on a club cross country team. They were in a homeschool girl scout troop until this year when they decided to take a break. We were part of a coop for years where the girls took classes of their choosing. Here in Houston the history museum, science museum and zoo have special programs for homeschoolers. The YMCA also offers P.E. and other classes. My girls are much more social and outgoing than most public schooled kids. I got in trouble for this statement on this board a few years ago. So I will add 'in my experience'. I was there when my boys got off the bus and there were kids who never talked to anybody all day long. Being in a room with 25-35 kids the same age as you 8 hours a day does not = socialization in my opinion.

Props to you and all the other parents on here that do make the commitment to home school.  It's a lot of work and I know I could never do it.  I'd last a week maybe.  ;-)

As I mentioned above.  Good parents = Good kids and I also agree that there isn't much social aspect about sitting in a class with 20-30 other kids.  I think there may be an argument that you have to be a little more purposeful about getting your kids involved in sports and such because at school they here about this club and that club or tryouts for this and that.

I think the people who argue that there isn't enough social interaction with home school kids are talking about the ones whose parents home school them "and" isolate them from everyone else.  My son has one friend in church whose parents home school him, but won't let him participate in any sports or extra curricular activities at all.  He does still get interaction at church, but it may or may not be enough.  He seems like a good kid though, so my "Good Parents" theory may still override it.  

Oh, on a little bit of a tangent, but home school related.  I've got another friend that has a home schooled son who is a Junior in High School.  He swims for the public High School swim team, but there's some kind of rule that he has to take at least two classes at the school in order to qualify to participate on the swim team.  He's just taking a couple of dumb easy classes, but I thought that was a little interesting.  I'm not sure if it's just a Nebraska athletic rule to prevent dropouts from playing or if it's more common.

2013-10-04 8:01 AM
in reply to: tuwood

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool
Originally posted by tuwood

Originally posted by KeriKadi Hey there, I have been homeschooling my daughters now 11, 10 and 6 from the beginning. We sent our two boys to public school, both graduated having done well throughout one of them mostly honors classes. They were very ill prepared for college. Here in Texas teaching to the test is the most important thing to schools. Teachers hands are tied and it makes them crazy. In my experience if you put 10 homeschooling parents in a room at least 5 of them were teachers. Please plug yourself in, there are options. My daughters go to a school for homeschoolers, weird right? They go one day a week 9:15 (sleep is important) to 2:45. At school they take Creative Writing, Science, Spanish, Art and P.E. where they get to play dodgeball!!!!! They get homework we work on at home. The writing class is history based so they learn and remember history more than kids who are taught only about wars in school. One of my daughters needs to learn math a few different ways so we chose Math U See because they use a DVD, workbook, textbook and small blocks the girls can build and solve problems. They take a tennis & gymnastics for homeschoolers and are on a club cross country team. They were in a homeschool girl scout troop until this year when they decided to take a break. We were part of a coop for years where the girls took classes of their choosing. Here in Houston the history museum, science museum and zoo have special programs for homeschoolers. The YMCA also offers P.E. and other classes. My girls are much more social and outgoing than most public schooled kids. I got in trouble for this statement on this board a few years ago. So I will add 'in my experience'. I was there when my boys got off the bus and there were kids who never talked to anybody all day long. Being in a room with 25-35 kids the same age as you 8 hours a day does not = socialization in my opinion.

Props to you and all the other parents on here that do make the commitment to home school.  It's a lot of work and I know I could never do it.  I'd last a week maybe.  ;-)

As I mentioned above.  Good parents = Good kids and I also agree that there isn't much social aspect about sitting in a class with 20-30 other kids.  I think there may be an argument that you have to be a little more purposeful about getting your kids involved in sports and such because at school they here about this club and that club or tryouts for this and that.

I think the people who argue that there isn't enough social interaction with home school kids are talking about the ones whose parents home school them "and" isolate them from everyone else.  My son has one friend in church whose parents home school him, but won't let him participate in any sports or extra curricular activities at all.  He does still get interaction at church, but it may or may not be enough.  He seems like a good kid though, so my "Good Parents" theory may still override it.   :)

Oh, on a little bit of a tangent, but home school related.  I've got another friend that has a home schooled son who is a Junior in High School.  He swims for the public High School swim team, but there's some kind of rule that he has to take at least two classes at the school in order to qualify to participate on the swim team.  He's just taking a couple of dumb easy classes, but I thought that was a little interesting.  I'm not sure if it's just a Nebraska athletic rule to prevent dropouts from playing or if it's more common.

This is called "dual enrollment".  Dual enrollment is available in many states and is a great option for a lot of families.  This is a very popular option for kids who are very competitive athletes who need more sleep and more time to train during the day.  It's actually a great option for lots of homeschoolers.  Sometimes the kids just take BS classes to fill the requirement so they can participate in team sports, but sometimes parents would like to homeschool but don't think they can teach high school level math or science, or they'd like their child to take a language class or band.  It's great when you can pick and choose what you'd like to do with your child's curriculum and design the best plan for them. 
2013-10-04 6:23 PM
in reply to: trigal38

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool
Apparently my buddy doesn't know anything about it even though she homeschooled three kids.
Dunno, sorry about that.
2013-10-07 10:16 AM
in reply to: trigal38

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool
Just saw this thread. We homeschool our 6yr old, She's in 1st grade. Last year we had her at a private school that follows the Classical approach. We've found a large Classical Conversations homeschooling group that holds weekly all day sessions at a local church, they have a lead and tutors. I don't remember which math and science program we're following but it matches with the local private school we had her in last year. This way if/when we want to put her into school she is right there curriculum wise. This approach means we need to teach her Latin, and it's been interesting to start learning that with her. There are also twice a week local recess groups and other programs that many of the local homeschoolers join in.

I'd say start to look around locally and see what resources you can find and go meet and participate with them to see if it's right for you.

I know all kids are different, but NONE of the public school kids we are friends with are anywhere near our daughter or her homeschool peers in reading, writing, or math. Our kiddio is doing what would be 2nd grade math all ready including some simple algebra. She's been able to read Charlotte's Web to her self for months now. She even keeps a daily journal. We have a TV, Xbox, computers with Netflix.... so all of that is there, we're not some "nutty" reclusive homeschool crazies, and figuring out what works for us. We also keep up the program over the summer at a reduced pace. We're looking to keep her ahead of the program which gives us room for travel.

My wife grew up in Africa and went to boarding school in the UK. I went to parts of 5th and all of 6th Form in New Zealand (think 11th and 12th grade US). The British system is so much stronger than the US system for education and we want that for our kiddo.


2013-10-07 10:20 AM
in reply to: magic

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool

I would just like to add that last week my public school educated son got an "A" on one of his "food preparation" class assignments......it was called "bisquit pull-apart lab". 

We are all really proud of him.

2013-10-07 10:23 AM
in reply to: Left Brain

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool
Originally posted by Left Brain

I would just like to add that last week my public school educated son got an "A" on one of his "food preparation" class assignments......it was called "bisquit pull-apart lab". 

We are all really proud of him.

I see hints of Harvard

2013-10-07 10:43 AM
in reply to: tuwood

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool
Originally posted by tuwood
Originally posted by Left Brain

I would just like to add that last week my public school educated son got an "A" on one of his "food preparation" class assignments......it was called "bisquit pull-apart lab". 

We are all really proud of him.

I see hints of Harvard

Whatever dude.....it's all fun and games until you want a bisquit.

2013-10-07 11:24 AM
in reply to: Left Brain

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool
Originally posted by Left Brain
Originally posted by tuwood
Originally posted by Left Brain

I would just like to add that last week my public school educated son got an "A" on one of his "food preparation" class assignments......it was called "bisquit pull-apart lab". 

We are all really proud of him.

I see hints of Harvard

Whatever dude.....it's all fun and games until you want a bisquit.

Wait, what is the class called?  He's taking an entire class on food prep or is this a unit in a bigger class?

2013-10-07 11:39 AM
in reply to: switch

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool
Originally posted by switch
Originally posted by Left Brain
Originally posted by tuwood
Originally posted by Left Brain

I would just like to add that last week my public school educated son got an "A" on one of his "food preparation" class assignments......it was called "bisquit pull-apart lab". 

We are all really proud of him.

I see hints of Harvard

Whatever dude.....it's all fun and games until you want a bisquit.

Wait, what is the class called?  He's taking an entire class on food prep or is this a unit in a bigger class?

Yep, that's the class......he's an athlete. LMAOOO



2013-10-07 11:51 AM
in reply to: Left Brain

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool
Originally posted by Left Brain
Originally posted by switch
Originally posted by Left Brain
Originally posted by tuwood
Originally posted by Left Brain

I would just like to add that last week my public school educated son got an "A" on one of his "food preparation" class assignments......it was called "bisquit pull-apart lab". 

We are all really proud of him.

I see hints of Harvard

Whatever dude.....it's all fun and games until you want a bisquit.

Wait, what is the class called?  He's taking an entire class on food prep or is this a unit in a bigger class?

Yep, that's the class......he's an athlete. LMAOOO

 Did he make them from a mix or from scratch? Actually, making a good biscuit with butter or lard from scratch takes some skill and a little bit of science, so not a terrible lesson.

Actually, in terms of "life skills" there probably isn't a better class for your son to take :)

You're prepping a lot of food to get 6000 cals a day of quality food.

 

2013-10-07 11:59 AM
in reply to: switch

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool
Originally posted by switch
Originally posted by Left Brain
Originally posted by switch
Originally posted by Left Brain
Originally posted by tuwood
Originally posted by Left Brain

I would just like to add that last week my public school educated son got an "A" on one of his "food preparation" class assignments......it was called "bisquit pull-apart lab". 

We are all really proud of him.

I see hints of Harvard

Whatever dude.....it's all fun and games until you want a bisquit.

Wait, what is the class called?  He's taking an entire class on food prep or is this a unit in a bigger class?

Yep, that's the class......he's an athlete. LMAOOO

 Did he make them from a mix or from scratch? Actually, making a good biscuit with butter or lard from scratch takes some skill and a little bit of science, so not a terrible lesson.

Actually, in terms of "life skills" there probably isn't a better class for your son to take

You're prepping a lot of food to get 6000 cals a day of quality food.

 

How do I know?  I never took the class. Laughing

2013-10-07 1:30 PM
in reply to: trigal38

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool
I have been a public school teacher for 17 years. I have seen students that were pulled out of public school to home school and home schoolers that were put into public school for various reasons.
Both can be either very good or very bad. It all comes down to your involvement.
I was labeled as reading deficient in 2nd grade. I went home in tears. My parents got some sort of program and we practiced reading every night. By the end of the year I was in the highest reading group.
Everything comes down to parents being involved, you are the first best teachers of your child.
2013-10-09 11:50 AM
in reply to: switch

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Subject: RE: Thinking about homeschool
Originally posted by switch
Originally posted by Left Brain
Originally posted by switch
Originally posted by Left Brain
Originally posted by tuwood
Originally posted by Left Brain

I would just like to add that last week my public school educated son got an "A" on one of his "food preparation" class assignments......it was called "bisquit pull-apart lab". 

We are all really proud of him.

I see hints of Harvard

Whatever dude.....it's all fun and games until you want a bisquit.

Wait, what is the class called?  He's taking an entire class on food prep or is this a unit in a bigger class?

Yep, that's the class......he's an athlete. LMAOOO

 Did he make them from a mix or from scratch? Actually, making a good biscuit with butter or lard from scratch takes some skill and a little bit of science, so not a terrible lesson.

Actually, in terms of "life skills" there probably isn't a better class for your son to take

You're prepping a lot of food to get 6000 cals a day of quality food.

 

He just pulled off another "A" in French Toast Lab.   LMAOOOOOOOOO

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