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2013-10-03 7:03 PM
in reply to: Asalzwed

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Subject: RE: Caloric Deficit and Racing Weight
With the mileage you are running, if you maintain solid nutritional habits (minimizing processed foods and sugar, controlling late-night snacking, etc.) I'm guessing the weight will eventually take care of itself. Everyone's body is different, but if you're still fairly new to running, and doing that kind of mileage, it takes time for the body to adapt to it, and one of those adaptations is a gradual loss of weight/fat. I'd focus less on calorie counting and more on really making sure that what you put into yourself is quality fuel, not empty calories. Calorie-counting can lead to a whole range of issues like denial, binges, and guilt, etc. which can really be counterproductive to health and running. Also, there is some research suggesting that for some women who do a lot of endurance training and restrict calories, running a persistent caloric deficit, metabolism can slow down and make weight loss very difficult. Probably the body's attempt to preserve fat for a potential baby in what the body perceives as a food shortage situation. It's hard to fight biology.

I don't know when you train but "running on empty" in the morning tends to kick-start the metabolism. (Probably not a good idea for very long runs, but anything within an hour or so should be doable.) I usually don't do that now, because at this point in my life (living in the developing world, with a physical job/lifestyle as well as training) I often have trouble keeping weight on (plus I'd be trying to steal my students' snacks), but it seemed to work well when I needed to lose a few pounds. It also may be helpful in training your body to use carbs more efficiently in long races.


2013-10-04 9:00 AM
in reply to: Hot Runner

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Subject: RE: Caloric Deficit and Racing Weight
Originally posted by Hot RunnerWith the mileage you are running, if you maintain solid nutritional habits (minimizing processed foods and sugar, controlling late-night snacking, etc.) I'm guessing the weight will eventually take care of itself. Everyone's body is different, but if you're still fairly new to running, and doing that kind of mileage, it takes time for the body to adapt to it, and one of those adaptations is a gradual loss of weight/fat. I'd focus less on calorie counting and more on really making sure that what you put into yourself is quality fuel, not empty calories. Calorie-counting can lead to a whole range of issues like denial, binges, and guilt, etc. which can really be counterproductive to health and running. Also, there is some research suggesting that for some women who do a lot of endurance training and restrict calories, running a persistent caloric deficit, metabolism can slow down and make weight loss very difficult. Probably the body's attempt to preserve fat for a potential baby in what the body perceives as a food shortage situation. It's hard to fight biology.I don't know when you train but "running on empty" in the morning tends to kick-start the metabolism. (Probably not a good idea for very long runs, but anything within an hour or so should be doable.) I usually don't do that now, because at this point in my life (living in the developing world, with a physical job/lifestyle as well as training) I often have trouble keeping weight on (plus I'd be trying to steal my students' snacks), but it seemed to work well when I needed to lose a few pounds. It also may be helpful in training your body to use carbs more efficiently in long races.
Awesome feedback. I hear ya about getting caught up in the calorie counting. I'm really not even talking about shedding a whole lot (maybe 1% body fat?) and honestly you are probably right in that it will take care of itself with training so long as I'm smart about what I do eat.Thanks again!
2013-10-04 9:26 AM
in reply to: Asalzwed

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Subject: RE: Caloric Deficit and Racing Weight
At the risk of sounding stupid, what IS racing weight????
2013-10-04 9:31 AM
in reply to: Rollergirl

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Subject: RE: Caloric Deficit and Racing Weight
Originally posted by RollergirlAt the risk of sounding stupid, what IS racing weight????
Nothing stupid about that...the short answer is that it is the optimal weight and body composition for an individual athlete that allows them to perform the best.
2013-10-04 9:32 AM
in reply to: Rollergirl

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Subject: RE: Caloric Deficit and Racing Weight

Originally posted by Rollergirl At the risk of sounding stupid, what IS racing weight????

As academic as I like to be in everything, this is a subject I'm not, but since this is the internet, I'll give what I think when I think racing weight.

I'm normally 155.  If I get above 158, I start "feeling" out of shape.  I simply feel sluggish and not athletic.  If I get below 150, I start feeling lethargic and weak.  However, When I'm around 151 pounds, I feel amazing.  I feel light and it's as if my steps have an extra level of spring in them.  I feel like I can go.  I've never felt like that and had a bad race.  

However it's very difficult for me to hold that weight, so I only really try to get there when I have a race coming up, since I can usually only hold that weight for a week or two.

2013-10-04 9:35 AM
in reply to: switch

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Subject: RE: Caloric Deficit and Racing Weight
Originally posted by switch

Originally posted by RollergirlAt the risk of sounding stupid, what IS racing weight????
Nothing stupid about that...the short answer is that it is the optimal weight and body composition for an individual athlete that allows them to perform the best.



Thanks, It all makes sense now I just couldn't figure it out. I thought about a weight class, like in boxing or other fight sports but it didn't make sense. Very interesting.


2013-10-04 9:41 AM
in reply to: msteiner

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Subject: RE: Caloric Deficit and Racing Weight
Originally posted by msteiner

Originally posted by Rollergirl At the risk of sounding stupid, what IS racing weight????

As academic as I like to be in everything, this is a subject I'm not, but since this is the internet, I'll give what I think when I think racing weight.

I'm normally 155.  If I get above 158, I start "feeling" out of shape.  I simply feel sluggish and not athletic.  If I get below 150, I start feeling lethargic and weak.  However, When I'm around 151 pounds, I feel amazing.  I feel light and it's as if my steps have an extra level of spring in them.  I feel like I can go.  I've never felt like that and had a bad race.  

However it's very difficult for me to hold that weight, so I only really try to get there when I have a race coming up, since I can usually only hold that weight for a week or two.




Wow, I'll have to find what mine is. I always thought that your "natural weight" is the one you always get back to, even if you would like to weigh under a certain number in your head (my case) So that would be easy to maintain, but maybe it's not the same as racing weight.
2013-10-04 9:47 AM
in reply to: Rollergirl

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Subject: RE: Caloric Deficit and Racing Weight
Originally posted by Rollergirl

Originally posted by msteiner

Originally posted by Rollergirl At the risk of sounding stupid, what IS racing weight????

As academic as I like to be in everything, this is a subject I'm not, but since this is the internet, I'll give what I think when I think racing weight.

I'm normally 155.  If I get above 158, I start "feeling" out of shape.  I simply feel sluggish and not athletic.  If I get below 150, I start feeling lethargic and weak.  However, When I'm around 151 pounds, I feel amazing.  I feel light and it's as if my steps have an extra level of spring in them.  I feel like I can go.  I've never felt like that and had a bad race.  

However it's very difficult for me to hold that weight, so I only really try to get there when I have a race coming up, since I can usually only hold that weight for a week or two.




Wow, I'll have to find what mine is. I always thought that your "natural weight" is the one you always get back to, even if you would like to weigh under a certain number in your head (my case) So that would be easy to maintain, but maybe it's not the same as racing weight.


I've just reread your answer and you wrote it, it's not the same, your naturlal weight is 155, and your racing weight is 151
2013-10-04 11:08 AM
in reply to: Rollergirl

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Subject: RE: Caloric Deficit and Racing Weight
Originally posted by Rollergirl
Originally posted by Rollergirl
Originally posted by msteiner

Originally posted by Rollergirl At the risk of sounding stupid, what IS racing weight????

As academic as I like to be in everything, this is a subject I'm not, but since this is the internet, I'll give what I think when I think racing weight.

I'm normally 155.  If I get above 158, I start "feeling" out of shape.  I simply feel sluggish and not athletic.  If I get below 150, I start feeling lethargic and weak.  However, When I'm around 151 pounds, I feel amazing.  I feel light and it's as if my steps have an extra level of spring in them.  I feel like I can go.  I've never felt like that and had a bad race.  

However it's very difficult for me to hold that weight, so I only really try to get there when I have a race coming up, since I can usually only hold that weight for a week or two.

Wow, I'll have to find what mine is. I always thought that your "natural weight" is the one you always get back to, even if you would like to weigh under a certain number in your head (my case) So that would be easy to maintain, but maybe it's not the same as racing weight.
I've just reread your answer and you wrote it, it's not the same, your naturlal weight is 155, and your racing weight is 151

Yes, exactly.

Your racing weight is not sustainable and should probably not be held for an extended period of time.

2013-10-04 11:26 AM
in reply to: Asalzwed

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Subject: RE: Caloric Deficit and Racing Weight
Originally posted by Asalzwed
Originally posted by Rollergirl
Originally posted by Rollergirl
Originally posted by msteiner

Originally posted by Rollergirl At the risk of sounding stupid, what IS racing weight????

As academic as I like to be in everything, this is a subject I'm not, but since this is the internet, I'll give what I think when I think racing weight.

I'm normally 155.  If I get above 158, I start "feeling" out of shape.  I simply feel sluggish and not athletic.  If I get below 150, I start feeling lethargic and weak.  However, When I'm around 151 pounds, I feel amazing.  I feel light and it's as if my steps have an extra level of spring in them.  I feel like I can go.  I've never felt like that and had a bad race.  

However it's very difficult for me to hold that weight, so I only really try to get there when I have a race coming up, since I can usually only hold that weight for a week or two.

Wow, I'll have to find what mine is. I always thought that your "natural weight" is the one you always get back to, even if you would like to weigh under a certain number in your head (my case) So that would be easy to maintain, but maybe it's not the same as racing weight.
I've just reread your answer and you wrote it, it's not the same, your naturlal weight is 155, and your racing weight is 151

Yes, exactly.

Your racing weight is not sustainable and should probably not be held for an extended period of time.

Bingo!  My natural weight ranges around 172lbs but racing weight (which I'm still trying to nail one of these days) I think is around 160-165.  

2013-10-04 12:08 PM
in reply to: Asalzwed

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Subject: RE: Caloric Deficit and Racing Weight
Originally posted by Asalzwed

Originally posted by Rollergirl
Originally posted by Rollergirl
Originally posted by msteiner

Originally posted by Rollergirl At the risk of sounding stupid, what IS racing weight????

As academic as I like to be in everything, this is a subject I'm not, but since this is the internet, I'll give what I think when I think racing weight.

I'm normally 155.  If I get above 158, I start "feeling" out of shape.  I simply feel sluggish and not athletic.  If I get below 150, I start feeling lethargic and weak.  However, When I'm around 151 pounds, I feel amazing.  I feel light and it's as if my steps have an extra level of spring in them.  I feel like I can go.  I've never felt like that and had a bad race.  

However it's very difficult for me to hold that weight, so I only really try to get there when I have a race coming up, since I can usually only hold that weight for a week or two.

Wow, I'll have to find what mine is. I always thought that your "natural weight" is the one you always get back to, even if you would like to weigh under a certain number in your head (my case) So that would be easy to maintain, but maybe it's not the same as racing weight.
I've just reread your answer and you wrote it, it's not the same, your naturlal weight is 155, and your racing weight is 151

Yes, exactly.

Your racing weight is not sustainable and should probably not be held for an extended period of time.




Very well put. I thought my ideal race weight was ~150. Then I got down to 146. Then I raced IMAZ at 138 and felt great (except for the run because, well, it's running). I raced most the the bike season in the low 140's and plumped up in the off season to the mid/high 140's. I'm now working my way back to the high 130's because that's when I was fastest and felt he best. But I know it's not sustainable all year. It also conflicts with my other goal - the annihilation of chocolate via my mouth.


2013-10-04 12:18 PM
in reply to: MonkeyClaw

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Subject: RE: Caloric Deficit and Racing Weight
Originally posted by MonkeyClaw
Originally posted by Asalzwed
Originally posted by Rollergirl
Originally posted by Rollergirl
Originally posted by msteiner

Originally posted by Rollergirl At the risk of sounding stupid, what IS racing weight????

As academic as I like to be in everything, this is a subject I'm not, but since this is the internet, I'll give what I think when I think racing weight.

I'm normally 155.  If I get above 158, I start "feeling" out of shape.  I simply feel sluggish and not athletic.  If I get below 150, I start feeling lethargic and weak.  However, When I'm around 151 pounds, I feel amazing.  I feel light and it's as if my steps have an extra level of spring in them.  I feel like I can go.  I've never felt like that and had a bad race.  

However it's very difficult for me to hold that weight, so I only really try to get there when I have a race coming up, since I can usually only hold that weight for a week or two.

Wow, I'll have to find what mine is. I always thought that your "natural weight" is the one you always get back to, even if you would like to weigh under a certain number in your head (my case) So that would be easy to maintain, but maybe it's not the same as racing weight.
I've just reread your answer and you wrote it, it's not the same, your naturlal weight is 155, and your racing weight is 151

Yes, exactly.

Your racing weight is not sustainable and should probably not be held for an extended period of time.

Very well put. I thought my ideal race weight was ~150. Then I got down to 146. Then I raced IMAZ at 138 and felt great (except for the run because, well, it's running). I raced most the the bike season in the low 140's and plumped up in the off season to the mid/high 140's. I'm now working my way back to the high 130's because that's when I was fastest and felt he best. But I know it's not sustainable all year. It also conflicts with my other goal - the annihilation of chocolate via my mouth.

Oh! Glad to see someone with similar goals. Mine is slightly different, still mouth annihilation, but with beer Smile

2013-10-04 12:30 PM
in reply to: Asalzwed

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Subject: RE: Caloric Deficit and Racing Weight
Originally posted by Asalzwed
Originally posted by MonkeyClaw
Originally posted by Asalzwed
Originally posted by Rollergirl
Originally posted by Rollergirl
Originally posted by msteiner

Originally posted by Rollergirl At the risk of sounding stupid, what IS racing weight????

As academic as I like to be in everything, this is a subject I'm not, but since this is the internet, I'll give what I think when I think racing weight.

I'm normally 155.  If I get above 158, I start "feeling" out of shape.  I simply feel sluggish and not athletic.  If I get below 150, I start feeling lethargic and weak.  However, When I'm around 151 pounds, I feel amazing.  I feel light and it's as if my steps have an extra level of spring in them.  I feel like I can go.  I've never felt like that and had a bad race.  

However it's very difficult for me to hold that weight, so I only really try to get there when I have a race coming up, since I can usually only hold that weight for a week or two.

Wow, I'll have to find what mine is. I always thought that your "natural weight" is the one you always get back to, even if you would like to weigh under a certain number in your head (my case) So that would be easy to maintain, but maybe it's not the same as racing weight.
I've just reread your answer and you wrote it, it's not the same, your naturlal weight is 155, and your racing weight is 151

Yes, exactly.

Your racing weight is not sustainable and should probably not be held for an extended period of time.

Very well put. I thought my ideal race weight was ~150. Then I got down to 146. Then I raced IMAZ at 138 and felt great (except for the run because, well, it's running). I raced most the the bike season in the low 140's and plumped up in the off season to the mid/high 140's. I'm now working my way back to the high 130's because that's when I was fastest and felt he best. But I know it's not sustainable all year. It also conflicts with my other goal - the annihilation of chocolate via my mouth.

Oh! Glad to see someone with similar goals. Mine is slightly different, still mouth annihilation, but with beer Smile

We live in the same world.  Damn beer, if I didn't love you so much.

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