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2013-10-06 9:02 PM
in reply to: pga_mike

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Subject: RE: My Carbon Monoxide Detector...
Originally posted by pga_mike

Originally posted by briderdt

Originally posted by Moonrocket I do think Carbon Monoxide is heavy and sinks though- so your detector is supposed to be near the ground- vs. smoke which should be up high.

I just checked this because I was wondering the same thing -- article said that a high placement was recommended because CO would generally be accompanied by hot gases when generated, so it would rise.

http://www.homesafe.com/coalert/detect.htm



If the carbon monoxide detector is accompanied by hot gasses, I'd assume that other detectors would be going off, and the flames licking at your tushy would put CO low on the SWOT analysis.

I think that you want it where it could detect failure without flames. Just a golf pro's opinion.


I am really putting my thinking cap on for this SWOT
Strength: I'd rather die from CO^2 than burning to death
Weakness: Chaning the battery to stop the beeping would be even harder when you add smoke
opportunity: If the house burns down I don't have to change the battery
Threat: there seem to be plenty in this scenario.


2013-10-06 9:38 PM
in reply to: Moonrocket

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Subject: RE: My Carbon Monoxide Detector...
Originally posted by Moonrocket
Originally posted by pga_mike
Originally posted by briderdt

Originally posted by Moonrocket I do think Carbon Monoxide is heavy and sinks though- so your detector is supposed to be near the ground- vs. smoke which should be up high.

I just checked this because I was wondering the same thing -- article said that a high placement was recommended because CO would generally be accompanied by hot gases when generated, so it would rise.

http://www.homesafe.com/coalert/detect.htm

If the carbon monoxide detector is accompanied by hot gasses, I'd assume that other detectors would be going off, and the flames licking at your tushy would put CO low on the SWOT analysis. I think that you want it where it could detect failure without flames. Just a golf pro's opinion.
I am really putting my thinking cap on for this SWOT Strength: I'd rather die from CO^2 than burning to death Weakness: Chaning the battery to stop the beeping would be even harder when you add smoke opportunity: If the house burns down I don't have to change the battery Threat: there seem to be plenty in this scenario.

 

Impressive.  I never made it past the tushy-licking.

2013-10-06 9:41 PM
in reply to: 0

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Subject: RE: My Carbon Monoxide Detector...
Originally posted by Moonrocket
Originally posted by pga_mike
Originally posted by briderdt

Originally posted by Moonrocket I do think Carbon Monoxide is heavy and sinks though- so your detector is supposed to be near the ground- vs. smoke which should be up high.

I just checked this because I was wondering the same thing -- article said that a high placement was recommended because CO would generally be accompanied by hot gases when generated, so it would rise.

http://www.homesafe.com/coalert/detect.htm

If the carbon monoxide detector is accompanied by hot gasses, I'd assume that other detectors would be going off, and the flames licking at your tushy would put CO low on the SWOT analysis. I think that you want it where it could detect failure without flames. Just a golf pro's opinion.
I am really putting my thinking cap on for this SWOT Strength: I'd rather die from CO^2 than burning to death Weakness: Chaning the battery to stop the beeping would be even harder when you add smoke opportunity: If the house burns down I don't have to change the battery Threat: there seem to be plenty in this scenario.

I don't know where the ideal place to put one is.....but now that the weather is getting colder it's a good time to make sure you have one or two in your home.....along with checking your heating system if you use "organic matter" as fuel. It doesn't happen very often( carbon monoxide poisoning)....but when it does, it's very silent and VERY deadly.....and eery.  15 years ago I was at the scene of a family of four who just went to sleep one evening....and didn't wake up.  Squirrels had clogged up the flu on their gas (propane)furnace.



Edited by Left Brain 2013-10-06 9:43 PM
2013-10-07 11:59 AM
in reply to: Left Brain

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Seattle
Subject: RE: My Carbon Monoxide Detector...

Just to follow up, it was simply a dead/dying battery. OUr friend came over with his ladder and replaced the battery but we are going to relocate it in a few weeks so that this doesn't happen again.

2013-10-07 12:10 PM
in reply to: Left Brain

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Subject: RE: My Carbon Monoxide Detector...
Originally posted by Left Brain
Originally posted by Moonrocket
Originally posted by pga_mike
Originally posted by briderdt

Originally posted by Moonrocket I do think Carbon Monoxide is heavy and sinks though- so your detector is supposed to be near the ground- vs. smoke which should be up high.

I just checked this because I was wondering the same thing -- article said that a high placement was recommended because CO would generally be accompanied by hot gases when generated, so it would rise.

http://www.homesafe.com/coalert/detect.htm

If the carbon monoxide detector is accompanied by hot gasses, I'd assume that other detectors would be going off, and the flames licking at your tushy would put CO low on the SWOT analysis. I think that you want it where it could detect failure without flames. Just a golf pro's opinion.
I am really putting my thinking cap on for this SWOT Strength: I'd rather die from CO^2 than burning to death Weakness: Chaning the battery to stop the beeping would be even harder when you add smoke opportunity: If the house burns down I don't have to change the battery Threat: there seem to be plenty in this scenario.

I don't know where the ideal place to put one is.....but now that the weather is getting colder it's a good time to make sure you have one or two in your home.....along with checking your heating system if you use "organic matter" as fuel. It doesn't happen very often( carbon monoxide poisoning)....but when it does, it's very silent and VERY deadly.....and eery.  15 years ago I was at the scene of a family of four who just went to sleep one evening....and didn't wake up.  Squirrels had clogged up the flu on their gas (propane)furnace.

Further proof of my friend's theory that squirrels are evil and plotting the demise of humans!

2013-10-07 3:47 PM
in reply to: Left Brain

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Seattle
Subject: RE: My Carbon Monoxide Detector...
Originally posted by Left Brain
Originally posted by Moonrocket
Originally posted by pga_mike
Originally posted by briderdt

Originally posted by Moonrocket I do think Carbon Monoxide is heavy and sinks though- so your detector is supposed to be near the ground- vs. smoke which should be up high.

I just checked this because I was wondering the same thing -- article said that a high placement was recommended because CO would generally be accompanied by hot gases when generated, so it would rise.

http://www.homesafe.com/coalert/detect.htm

If the carbon monoxide detector is accompanied by hot gasses, I'd assume that other detectors would be going off, and the flames licking at your tushy would put CO low on the SWOT analysis. I think that you want it where it could detect failure without flames. Just a golf pro's opinion.
I am really putting my thinking cap on for this SWOT Strength: I'd rather die from CO^2 than burning to death Weakness: Chaning the battery to stop the beeping would be even harder when you add smoke opportunity: If the house burns down I don't have to change the battery Threat: there seem to be plenty in this scenario.

I don't know where the ideal place to put one is.....but now that the weather is getting colder it's a good time to make sure you have one or two in your home.....along with checking your heating system if you use "organic matter" as fuel. It doesn't happen very often( carbon monoxide poisoning)....but when it does, it's very silent and VERY deadly.....and eery.  15 years ago I was at the scene of a family of four who just went to sleep one evening....and didn't wake up.  Squirrels had clogged up the flu on their gas (propane)furnace.

Yeah, absolutely. As much as we joked about bashing the thing in, we will always keep it functioning.

 

We have radiant heat. If a squirrel got involved I would likely live and there would be hellz to pay.



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