US State Forums Georgia » To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn? Rss Feed  
Moderators: milaminute, Ron Reply
2013-10-21 6:19 PM

User image

Master
1729
100050010010025
Atlanta, GA
Subject: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?

As the season comes to an end, it is a great time to take inventory and look forward.   So, I would like to encourage everyone that was new to tri to share their top 3  "ahh ha" moments.     While it was not my first season, I had plenty of moments!

  1. It is true that you lose muscle mass when you get older.  I finally admitted that I am old and need to spend time in the gym.
  2. Man can't live on running alone.  I was frustrated with lack of run ability, ramped up my miles and promptly got hurt.   Balance counts, slow ramp is best.
  3. I need to spend more time with my tri friends working out.  I did way too much lone wolf over the last few years and it slowly effected my motivation and performance.

 



2013-10-22 5:08 PM
in reply to: thecaptin

User image

Master
1729
100050010010025
Atlanta, GA
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?

come on people...feel like I am out on a limb, naked...no one wants to share anything that could help a fellow racer?  Really?   Throw me (and your peers) a bone...

2013-10-22 5:35 PM
in reply to: thecaptin

User image

Elite
3329
2000100010010010025
Pinehurst, NC
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?
1. Training with your friends can be a great motivator. I too have done lots of training lone-wolf style, and while it has its place, meeting a friend for a ride or run can sometimes help with the motivation.

2. Swimming is still hard and it sucks.

3. Don't underestimate rest/recovery. I made it a point to rest/recover more this training cycle and feel stronger for it.
2013-10-22 5:53 PM
in reply to: d00d

User image

Veteran
462
1001001001002525
STATESBORO, GA
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?
1) A long break is called for when you feel like you need it. I was spent after a very tough race at a ultra in feb. I did almost nothing from Feb to June then really wanted to go hard and trained well from June on. The shorter more focused IM training was better for my overall contentment during the block.
2) Despite all the debate, all the lack of interest in swimming more - when I swim 3x per week it pays off.
3) I do not have my nutrition plan nailed down for long races. My goal is to nail this down.
4) I suck at running and have to determine if I can improve this to accomplish more of my goals. It may be a mental issue but it has to be improved to meet some of my goals.
5) I really enjoy life more when I am training. However, balance during peaks never gets easy.
2013-10-23 9:26 AM
in reply to: kstater39

User image

Master
2074
20002525
Atlanta
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?
The Year's Top Epiphanies:

1. A base is not enough. My training for an IM in January was lackluster and unenthusiastic, and I was delusional in expecting better results than I got.

2. Strength/Resistance training is really important the longer you train for long-course triathlon.

3. I'm much more likely to push myself in a group setting(I already knew that one but I have to keep re-learning).

11 years of continuous triathlon racing and I still learn stuff by watching what other people are doing...ergo, the beauty of BT.
2013-10-23 10:53 AM
in reply to: alltom1

User image

Elite
3459
200010001001001001002525
SE
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?
1. lack of intensity on the run prevents injuries and the myth that you have to run fast to run fast is just a myth, but make sure to get intensity on the bike and swim
2. you don't need sugar to perform long course well. ucan do it without sugar!
3. hokas were a game changer for me.


2013-10-24 8:27 AM
in reply to: phatknot

User image

Member
266
1001002525
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?
1. It doesnt matter what kind of shape you're in, sometimes it isnt your day and you need to adjust your goals. I didn't at IMTX and paid for it with a trip to medical tent and a DNF.
2. You cant BS your way through nutrition, you have to nail it...which I've never done. (help anyone?)
3. Don't get upset with a bad race and take the summer 'off'. i'm finally in the mood to push the envelope again and now its winter. Push through the season and take as much off season time off as necessary to carry your motivation over.


2013-10-24 8:29 AM
in reply to: phatknot

User image

Member
266
1001002525
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?
Originally posted by phatknot

1. lack of intensity on the run prevents injuries and the myth that you have to run fast to run fast is just a myth, but make sure to get intensity on the bike and swim
2. you don't need sugar to perform long course well. ucan do it without sugar!
3. hokas were a game changer for me.



nice subtle UCAN reference. I actually am going to try it, because I hate eating on the bike/run. Any suggestions? If you do eat with it, what do you eat? (obviously not sugar filled treats).
2013-10-24 11:14 AM
in reply to: Iwannarunlikeforrest

User image

Elite
3459
200010001001001001002525
SE
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?
bananas, raisins, dates are my faves. there was a thread on table food last winter that covered this subject too.
2013-10-24 1:57 PM
in reply to: phatknot

User image

Master
1360
10001001001002525
Evans, GA
Gold member
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?

1. Have fun. If you start to not have fun it is time for a break.

2. Don't overlook nutrition/hydration especially on long course races. I blew a great race at Bone Island this year by screwing up nutrition and paid for it the last 16 miles.

3. Don't get caught up in all of the hoopla of needing the newest latest greatest gear. I bet for most of us it is the engine that needs the work.

 

2013-10-24 2:55 PM
in reply to: csharp1171

User image

Member
266
1001002525
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?
Originally posted by csharp1171

1. Have fun. If you start to not have fun it is time for a break.

2. Don't overlook nutrition/hydration especially on long course races. I blew a great race at Bone Island this year by screwing up nutrition and paid for it the last 16 miles.

3. Don't get caught up in all of the hoopla of needing the newest latest greatest gear. I bet for most of us it is the engine that needs the work.

 





^^^^^^ THIS

its so easy to get caught up in wheels, helmets, wetsuits, etc. If i spent all the time I use to surf the web for tri stuff on the trainer, I'd be killer!!


2013-10-24 6:47 PM
in reply to: Iwannarunlikeforrest

User image

Master
1729
100050010010025
Atlanta, GA
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?

I have long since given up chasing the latest and greatest...totally agree with that comment.  I read a recent article that talked about the amount of time saved/gained on cornering properly will give you more time than a $300 helmet.   In the roadie world, a nice bike is peacocking but it is always about the man, not machine.

I wandered off the tri reservation because of too much "lone wolfing" and lost the joy in it.  I will not make that mistake again (at least for a year or so).

 

2013-10-24 7:18 PM
in reply to: thecaptin

User image

New user
60
2525
Silver member
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?
1. Keep practicing nutrition. Augusta was my first HIM and I missed the nutrition coming off the bike and paid for it the final 5 miles of the run...I need a lot of work on this next year.
2. Agree that group training helps the motivation and also keeps me challenged...i did quite a bit of lone wolf due to work travel schedule but need a group to help with my motivation going into next year.
3. Don't give up...I had a rough HIM run and also a difficult Olympic early in the year but completed both and learned a lot about myself and where i needed to focus my training to improve.
2013-10-24 8:50 PM
in reply to: thecaptin

User image

Master
1360
10001001001002525
Evans, GA
Gold member
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?

Originally posted by thecaptin

I read a recent article that talked about the amount of time saved/gained on cornering properly will give you more time than a $300 helmet.

Could not agree more. In the last sprint I did I passed 10+ people in the last 1/2 mile because it was curvy. I tend to corner a little better than others from riding motorcycles. 3 of those people I passed were in my age group and they all passed me on the run because my run sucks but it can make a big difference. Cornering rocks until you push the limit of traction

2013-10-25 4:44 AM
in reply to: Gene67

User image

Master
1729
100050010010025
Atlanta, GA
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?

Originally posted by Gene67 1. Keep practicing nutrition. Augusta was my first HIM and I missed the nutrition coming off the bike and paid for it the final 5 miles of the run...I need a lot of work on this next year. 2. Agree that group training helps the motivation and also keeps me challenged...i did quite a bit of lone wolf due to work travel schedule but need a group to help with my motivation going into next year. 3. Don't give up...I had a rough HIM run and also a difficult Olympic early in the year but completed both and learned a lot about myself and where i needed to focus my training to improve.
 

Every "vet" on this board has had a bad run day (or two or three)...it is not uncommon.  Keep plugging away and you will have more good days than bad.   Have you ever tried group runs?  I have been thinking about it.  My runs are ALWAYS solo.   Group runs tend to not follow MY pace, but they push you like a group ride.

2013-10-25 7:38 AM
in reply to: thecaptin

User image

Member
266
1001002525
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?
Seems like everyone is complaining about their lone wolf problem. You know...we could solve that and ride together

crazy idea right?


I'm moving into a house about a quarter mile from an entrance to stone mountain park next month. I'm looking forward to being able to run/ride out my front door into the park. Any and all are welcome to come park in front of my house and join me in your parka all winter long! Who know's...I might even supply beer afterwards.


2013-10-25 9:00 AM
in reply to: 0

User image

Champion
6973
500010005001001001001002525
marietta
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?

Originally posted by thecaptin

Originally posted by Gene67 1. Keep practicing nutrition. Augusta was my first HIM and I missed the nutrition coming off the bike and paid for it the final 5 miles of the run...I need a lot of work on this next year. 2. Agree that group training helps the motivation and also keeps me challenged...i did quite a bit of lone wolf due to work travel schedule but need a group to help with my motivation going into next year. 3. Don't give up...I had a rough HIM run and also a difficult Olympic early in the year but completed both and learned a lot about myself and where i needed to focus my training to improve.
 

Every "vet" on this board has had a bad run day (or two or three)...it is not uncommon.  Keep plugging away and you will have more good days than bad.   Have you ever tried group runs?  I have been thinking about it.  My runs are ALWAYS solo.   Group runs tend to not follow MY pace, but they push you like a group ride.

OH!  i have one!!!   what i learned + group training runs = 8u XC = AWESOME!!!

My runs were always solo as well.  then a few months ago my oldest joined a Jr cross country 8 and under team.  The coaches encouraged parents to run. So now I run 3 days a week with the kiddos, it's awesome!!!  You can get all kinds of workouts in.  One time I volunteered to rabbit the girls on hill repeats at Sope Creek.  I won't ever do that again... i was shattered after the fourth one.  They were all asking if i was ok... oh yeah, just a small cramp. I'll walk it off and catch up.  you girls go on ahead of me. the coaches and some parents new i was full of it and laughed at me... awesome!!!

  • one of the coolest things in life is watching my kids grow.  jack couldn't run a mile two months ago.  now he can handle four in the hills at Sope. he'll be crushing mom soon... hahahaha!
  • it's not just the kids that love this, parents that haven't run in 20 years or even ever are showing up.  even east cobb mom comes out to play sometimes!
  • our two younger daughters and some of his friends are all about signing up for the spring track season.  positive influence!!!

yeah, so i guess this year i learned that group runs are cool and they are even better with my children.  and they can crush you!

 

edit... almost forgot.  table food is awesome too!!!



Edited by fattyfatfat 2013-10-25 9:02 AM
2013-10-25 11:07 AM
in reply to: 0


235
10010025
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?
This was my second season of triathlon so I still felt like a noob. Last year I did four sprints of various distances and this year did a sprint and HIM. I'll bullet what I learned (in no particular order):

1. I still have a lot to learn

2. Triathlons are by far the most diverse sport / activity I have done in my life. Age, race, gender, shape, size, etc are represented in triathlon far more than other sports / activities I do on a regular basis (basketball, golf, snow sports). It's pretty cool to see that.

3. Getting on a "real" running program (Barry P plan) was the second smartest decision I made, especially considering I didn't come from a distance running background and dreaded running.

4. Putting a heavy focus on my swimming was probably the smartest decision I made for two main reasons, a) I did not have a strong swimming background and b) I was prone to panic attacks in open water. By really focusing on swimming my confidence in my abilities increased so much that I didn't have a panic attack in either race this year. I felt that no matter how strong I was on the bike and run that if I started off with a bad swim it would set a negative tone for me for the rest of the day thus possibly affecting my performance. It also helped that I was able to find an awesome open water swim course and practice (thank you, Swim with Pete!) that also increased my confidence and calmed my nerves in the water.

5. This stuff is EXPENSIVE. I thought golf and snowboarding were expensive but this is up there. I also realized that it is an investment and done properly I will see the returns.

6. Need to bike more and find more convenient, but safe, routes near where I live and work. I really let unusually bad summer weather (e.g., record rain) affect my training and relegated myself too much to indoor training in spin classes (but I went hard) and one outdoor ride per week. This offseason I have made a significant investment in a pain cave and will be training with TrainerRoad. Like running, I need something structured. Once Spring hits, and based on my work schedule, my plan is to be on my bike for at least 75% of my training time. I finally found a nice route near my office to bike on during the week but didn't discover it until a few weeks before my HIM; will definitely be a regular out there next year.

7. Keeping a detailed log of my workouts. I became OBSESSED with logging my workouts daily in my self-created spreadsheet, which in turn not only motivated me to improve but also kept me honest to staying on schedule and not slacking. This really helped my overall training.

8. Continue to refine race day nutrition. This requires a lot more education on my part but I think I know at least enough to know what I don't know and need to focus on going forward.

9. This is really fun, addicting, and a good way to meet all sorts of people. Also, if you aren't motivated or inspired by the stories you hear in triathlon (e.g., racing for a cause, people overcoming disabilities / sickness) or by watching the Ironman live finish line feeds then you may not have a pulse.

10. This is harder than it looks. By far, triathlon is the most challenging physical activity I have done and that includes all of the sports I have played, obstacle courses, military basic training, and surviving my pledge semester, but it is more rewarding than it is challenging.


Edited by tb1000 2013-10-25 11:18 AM
2013-10-25 8:28 PM
in reply to: fattyfatfat

User image

Elite
3459
200010001001001001002525
SE
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?
Originally posted by fattyfatfat

edit... almost forgot.  table food is awesome too!!!



love me good food
2013-10-25 8:53 PM
in reply to: csharp1171

User image

Extreme Veteran
637
50010025
Acworth, GA
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?
Originally posted by csharp1171

1. Have fun. If you start to not have fun it is time for a break

#1 - Maybe not time for a break but maybe a time to switch things up. I got burnt out of chasing splits/paces and the white line after a HIM 3 yrs ago so I decided to hit the trails with basically 0 mountain biking skills, let alone a mountain bike.

I have had an absolute blast, I enjoy the mtn biking and trail running aspect so much it doesn't even feel like training. I was surprised on how little I "lost" on the PTC sprint after 2 years of solely being on the dirt.

#2 - Captn mentioned and some others echoed about "lone-wolfing". That can be a major problem juggling schedules and coordinating with friends to meet up when it is not necessarily in the right "build" or workout. But what I have learned, so what if you skip/change a workout to squeeze in a ride or run with a buddy you haven't seen in a while. The mental break and uplift pays huge dividends on the "enjoy the sport" side.

#3 - We have a tendancy to way OVERTHINK things. Go back to #1 - do what's fun.
2013-10-25 11:40 PM
in reply to: Mc Q

User image

Veteran
555
5002525
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?
1. I needed more than a couple of weeks in a new brand of shoes before wearing them in a race. I got a calf cramp, which never happens to me. I wasn't sure it was the shoes, so I alternated with my old shoes during training for a couple of weeks, then did a 5k race and cramped again. Doh! These are now the shiniest grass mowing shoes I've ever owned.

2. I had a PR at my end of season sprint, with less running and less biking but more swimming. Swim training is not about shaving 30 seconds off a 12 minute swim. Swim training is about swimming well and not using as much energy and not being tired on the bike and run. I felt noticeably 'strong' on the bike, not 'winded' as in the past. In the past it took me the first 3 miles on the bike to get my HR down, this time less than 2.

3. In my 40's I was training 6 days a week. Now past 50 I need a day off after every hard effort on the bike, which is usually twice a week. Or perhaps I need to change from 1 easy bike day and 2 hard bike days, to 2 easy bike days and 1 hard bike day. Still working on this one. It's a drag to try to go hard on the bike and still feel the fatigue in the quads from yesterday, or the day before.

4. No great lessons nutritionally this year, I've been doing only shorter stuff. I have been experimenting with 1/2 as much electrolyte mix (Gatorade or Powerbar Perform) and adding a tablespoon of honey. I can't tell much difference, but I'm hoping that much honey per week is reducing my spring and fall allergies. Or it might be a coincidence as it was a cooler summer.


2013-10-26 6:28 AM
in reply to: 0

User image

Master
1729
100050010010025
Atlanta, GA
Subject: RE: To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn?

Originally posted by Iwannarunlikeforrest Seems like everyone is complaining about their lone wolf problem. You know...we could solve that and ride together crazy idea right? I'm moving into a house about a quarter mile from an entrance to stone mountain park next month. I'm looking forward to being able to run/ride out my front door into the park. Any and all are welcome to come park in front of my house and join me in your parka all winter long! Who know's...I might even supply beer afterwards.

I am going to try to plan a BT group ride in Nov.   The problem will be location as we are spread out.   Open to suggestions

On Stone Mt., I use to do a group ride (Pizza Ride out of Avondale) that did a loop through it.   Holly bat shitz , there are some hills that will hurt.   The small hill by the golf course was my nemesis.   It set up the crazy fast climb up from the "lake".  If you stayed with the Cat 1/2 monsters driving the front, the rollers out of the park finished me off.   Loved that loop because it was a great yard stick of mental and physical.   How much could I take?   Good stuff.

 



Edited by thecaptin 2013-10-26 6:29 AM
New Thread
US State Forums Georgia » To All New Tri'ers - What did you learn? Rss Feed  
RELATED POSTS

Anyone doing the new 13.1 Marathon tomorrow?

Started by sdd
Views: 543 Posts: 11

2009-10-04 5:51 PM Reno8

What I learned from my Ironman Experience

Started by ADollar79
Views: 437 Posts: 6

2007-11-21 4:49 PM dave_w

Athens Area Tri'ers

Started by Daimyer
Views: 689 Posts: 21

2007-08-16 9:17 PM watergirl

Atlanta Women Tri'ers

Started by chop
Views: 590 Posts: 2

2005-03-10 2:57 PM Browe79

Atlanta Tri'ers- John Tanner State Park Pages: 1 2

Started by sranney
Views: 3083 Posts: 48

2005-04-28 3:27 PM chop
RELATED ARTICLES
date : April 28, 2011
author : fivecents
comments : 5
What my first sprint distance triathlon taught me about myself.
 
date : January 1, 2011
author : ahohl
comments : 0
Here are five steps to ensure that you keep your promise to yourself to get you to that first triathlon.
date : December 2, 2010
author : Sara McLarty
comments : 0
This installment of the BT Swim Series will focus on open water swimming and four drills to help you better prepare for your event.
 
date : November 4, 2010
author : Sara McLarty
comments : 0
This installment of the BT Swim Series will focus on swimming tools and how best to use them. Includes pull buoys, kickboards, fins, paddles and snorkels.
date : October 5, 2010
author : Sara McLarty
comments : 0
This installment of the BT Swim Series will focus on the four major parts of the arm stroke in freestyle: Catch, Pull, Finish, & Recovery.
 
date : September 3, 2010
author : Sara McLarty
comments : 1
This installment of the BT Swim Series will focus on being efficient in the water. Learning how to swim smooth and efficiently is important to becoming a great swimmer.
date : August 2, 2010
author : Sara McLarty
comments : 19
This installment of the BT Swim Series will focus on breathing. Before you can swim fast, you must learn how to control your breathing so that easy swimming does not leave you gasping after one lap.
 
date : August 17, 2007
author : scoli121
comments : 6
I quickly browsed an article in Men's Health that talked about doing a triathlon, and how it wasn't really that hard. With a "tsk!" I quickly turned the page while thinking, "Yeah, right!"