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2014-07-09 5:32 AM
in reply to: Kido


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Subject: RE: Best upgrade for bike and gear?

Originally posted by Kido

The "train more" answers always make me chuckle...  The question is was not how to get faster, it was the best upgrade...

So, if I just got money to burn, and want to buy some speed, what's the harm of spending money - I shouldn't and just train more?  If I can "buy" speed at whatever level of fitness I have or training level, why not?

Interesting how pros don't ride huffy bikes with loose clothing instead of working of fitness.  They have the fastest equipment AND work on the engine.  Mutually exclusive. 

 

For the OP.  You HAVE to go clipless.  It may take a moment to learn, but it's basically essential and FAR more efficient.  I can't even contemplate riding without them.

In order for bang for your buck, IMO? 

Tight cycling clothes - go with bibs, BTW.  That's the other thing I would never go back from.

An earo helmet would buy you a couple seconds over 40k IF you are in earo in the first place.  They don't have as much of an impact if you are sitting up.

Invest in light tool kit and inflator.  Less weight on the bike/more earo bag.

Some higher TPI tires and latex tubes.  Quick, but expensive and wear out fast.

Race wheels/lighter training wheels.

Investing in a proper fit is not really an upgrade, but could help with speed.

I'm 50/50 on setting up the road bike with earo bars.  Riding in the drops is probably just as effective.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Train more is almost always the right answer for the age grouper. And yes, I know the Op's question was about equipment.

AGers spend too much money buying stuff. That $2000 frame, $1800 pair of wheels, and $1500 Quark powermeter are all for naught if you're on your bike <5 hours per week, or not going hard enough during the time you're on your bike.

Equipment is still important, but it is def important to prioritize so you dont' waste time or money.

The totally appropriate analogy would be a racer trying to get fastest speed possible, buying aero everything for $10k+, but then have a suboptimal bike position, which gives a penalty that is so much bigger than all those aero benefits combined from wheels/frame/helmet/skinsuit.  Similarly, if you don't put in good training, the aero benefits are basically negligible in comparison to the missed fitness gains from missing out on that training, even if they're still there.



2014-07-09 5:59 AM
in reply to: yazmaster

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Subject: RE: Best upgrade for bike and gear?
Originally posted by yazmaster

AGers spend too much money buying stuff. That $2000 frame, $1800 pair of wheels, and $1500 Quark powermeter are all for naught if you're on your bike <5 hours per week, or not going hard enough during the time you're on your bike.

Equipment is still important, but it is def important to prioritize so you dont' waste time or money



I would actually argue that you got that backwards… if you only have 5hrs. per week, you REALLY need to make then count, so a power meter may be the best possible investment you can make. Using a power meter to train very specifically, you can gain more in 5hrs, than you would do if you "just ride" for 10 hours. Granted, you need to learn how to use the data and how to use it as a training tool, not just a very expensive toy.
2014-07-09 10:13 AM
in reply to: 0


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Subject: RE: Best upgrade for bike and gear?
Originally posted by mike761

Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by Clempson

Don't upgrade anything on the bike, and I don't consider shoes/pedals an upgrade so much as a necessary expense when getting a bike... kind of like a helmet.  just invest in a good bike fitting and get a few good cycling kits for training. 

best thing to do is ride your bike often and hard. 

^This

And.......the last thing I would ever put on a road bike is "aero bars".   Wait, let me rephrase....I would NEVER put "aero bars" on a road bike.  It's not exaggerating to say that everybody who does can't even ride their road bike to it's fullest capabilities yet.....and once you get close, get a TT bike.




In 1989 Greg Lemond put some aero bars on his road bike, he seemed to be able to ride his bike to its capabilities

That bike wasn't really a road bike from a geometry standpoint. It had the forward slopping top tube. There is an image near the bottom of this article.
http://justtritalk.com/the-history-of-triathlon-bikes-part-1/

here is the 2nd part of the article
http://justtritalk.com/history-of-tri-bikes-part-2-enter-the-aeroba...

part 3
http://justtritalk.com/a-brief-history-of-tri-bikes-part-3-enter-th...

Edited by Sidney Porter 2014-07-09 10:24 AM
2014-07-09 10:20 AM
in reply to: Sidney Porter

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Subject: RE: Best upgrade for bike and gear?

Originally posted by Sidney Porter
Originally posted by mike761
Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by Clempson

Don't upgrade anything on the bike, and I don't consider shoes/pedals an upgrade so much as a necessary expense when getting a bike... kind of like a helmet.  just invest in a good bike fitting and get a few good cycling kits for training. 

best thing to do is ride your bike often and hard. 

^This

And.......the last thing I would ever put on a road bike is "aero bars".   Wait, let me rephrase....I would NEVER put "aero bars" on a road bike.  It's not exaggerating to say that everybody who does can't even ride their road bike to it's fullest capabilities yet.....and once you get close, get a TT bike.

In 1989 Greg Lemond put some aero bars on his road bike, he seemed to be able to ride his bike to its capabilities
That bike wasn't really a road bike from a geometry standpoint. It had the forward slopping top tube. There is an image near the bottom of this article. http://justtritalk.com/the-history-of-triathlon-bikes-part-1/

Very cool article...thaniks!  I had a Dave Scott model Centurian back in the day. 

2014-07-09 10:31 AM
in reply to: Left Brain


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Subject: RE: Best upgrade for bike and gear?
Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by Sidney Porter
Originally posted by mike761
Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by Clempson

Don't upgrade anything on the bike, and I don't consider shoes/pedals an upgrade so much as a necessary expense when getting a bike... kind of like a helmet.  just invest in a good bike fitting and get a few good cycling kits for training. 

best thing to do is ride your bike often and hard. 

^This

And.......the last thing I would ever put on a road bike is "aero bars".   Wait, let me rephrase....I would NEVER put "aero bars" on a road bike.  It's not exaggerating to say that everybody who does can't even ride their road bike to it's fullest capabilities yet.....and once you get close, get a TT bike.

In 1989 Greg Lemond put some aero bars on his road bike, he seemed to be able to ride his bike to its capabilities
That bike wasn't really a road bike from a geometry standpoint. It had the forward slopping top tube. There is an image near the bottom of this article. http://justtritalk.com/the-history-of-triathlon-bikes-part-1/

Very cool article...thaniks!  I had a Dave Scott model Centurian back in the day. 



The "Miami Vice" bike.
2014-07-09 10:56 AM
in reply to: rodzilla

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Subject: RE: Best upgrade for bike and gear?
I put a sticker of Flash on my bike, and now I'm way faster.



2014-07-09 11:06 AM
in reply to: Sidney Porter

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Subject: RE: Best upgrade for bike and gear?

Originally posted by Sidney Porter
Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by Sidney Porter
Originally posted by mike761
Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by Clempson

Don't upgrade anything on the bike, and I don't consider shoes/pedals an upgrade so much as a necessary expense when getting a bike... kind of like a helmet.  just invest in a good bike fitting and get a few good cycling kits for training. 

best thing to do is ride your bike often and hard. 

^This

And.......the last thing I would ever put on a road bike is "aero bars".   Wait, let me rephrase....I would NEVER put "aero bars" on a road bike.  It's not exaggerating to say that everybody who does can't even ride their road bike to it's fullest capabilities yet.....and once you get close, get a TT bike.

In 1989 Greg Lemond put some aero bars on his road bike, he seemed to be able to ride his bike to its capabilities
That bike wasn't really a road bike from a geometry standpoint. It had the forward slopping top tube. There is an image near the bottom of this article. http://justtritalk.com/the-history-of-triathlon-bikes-part-1/

Very cool article...thaniks!  I had a Dave Scott model Centurian back in the day. 

The "Miami Vice" bike.

I had the two tone grey model that came after the pink/yellow/purple model.....but my uncle had the Miami Vice bike.  Good times.

2014-07-09 11:11 AM
in reply to: brucemorgan

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St Catharines, Ontario
Subject: RE: Best upgrade for bike and gear?
Originally posted by brucemorgan

Your first upgrade should be clipless pedals. These days I strongly recommend Speedplay for ease of entry/exit, short learning curve, dual sided.




x2

My entry level road bike I got for less than $800. Shoes and pedals were a significant investment (another $320) but are a big improvement on flats or cages.
2014-07-09 6:14 PM
in reply to: badmo77a

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Bellevue, WA
Subject: RE: Best upgrade for bike and gear?

Originally posted by badmo77a
Originally posted by brucemorgan

Your first upgrade should be clipless pedals. These days I strongly recommend Speedplay for ease of entry/exit, short learning curve, dual sided.

x2 My entry level road bike I got for less than $800. Shoes and pedals were a significant investment (another $320) but are a big improvement on flats or cages.

And if you get quality shoes and pedals, then when you upgrade an $800 bike to something fancier, you can transfer the pedals to the new bike and put the cheapie originals back on it.  No loss at all.

2014-07-09 7:00 PM
in reply to: brucemorgan

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Subject: RE: Best upgrade for bike and gear?

Originally posted by brucemorgan

Originally posted by badmo77a
Originally posted by brucemorgan

Your first upgrade should be clipless pedals. These days I strongly recommend Speedplay for ease of entry/exit, short learning curve, dual sided.

x2 My entry level road bike I got for less than $800. Shoes and pedals were a significant investment (another $320) but are a big improvement on flats or cages.

And if you get quality shoes and pedals, then when you upgrade an $800 bike to something fancier, you can transfer the pedals to the new bike and put the cheapie originals back on it.  No loss at all.

Yep...this is the main reason to invest in good shoes, pedals, and clothing first.  A good fitting, and a good saddle along with that if you are having comfort issues.  All of those things can be transferred over to a new bike.  Personally, I would not bother upgrading an entry level bike at all.  It's entry level for a reason...if you feel like you're getting more advanced in the sport, invest in a whole different bike and keep the entry level as a bike for bad weather or when your other bike is in the shop.

2014-07-09 7:31 PM
in reply to: #5022579

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Subject: RE: Best upgrade for bike and gear?
Thanks for the replies. I never had intentions of putting aero bars on as I figure for a novice rider the drops were just as good. Tires and wheels are way out of my budget as well. I do have shoes and I plan on getting the "speed play" zero pedals as I hear good things. My main issue now is do I do another sprint aug 24 or get my pedals? Want the pedals but I figure until I start training for HIM next June not sure if I should just wait and get for Christmas from the wife


2014-07-09 7:48 PM
in reply to: rodzilla

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Subject: RE: Best upgrade for bike and gear?

GP4000S tires are pretty affordable.  Usually around $40 or less per tire.  They are good enough to be an everyday tire, but I only use them for racing because I go through tires pretty fast. 

2014-07-10 5:38 AM
in reply to: rodzilla

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Subject: RE: Best upgrade for bike and gear?
Originally posted by rodzilla

Thanks for the replies. I never had intentions of putting aero bars ........
start training for HIM next June


Learning to ride properly in the drops is correct
Jan's suggestion on properly fitting short bars is correct and should be followed. Don't try to turn a road bike into a tri bike.

But aerobars do have a purpose on a road bike. There is a reason top pros (in ITU) use them. I wouldn't discount them so easily. You can get into a more aero and comfortable position with them.

I would do my research before discounting them.
2014-07-10 8:11 AM
in reply to: Clempson

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naperville, Illinois
Subject: RE: Best upgrade for bike and gear?
Originally posted by Clempson

Don't upgrade anything on the bike, and I don't consider shoes/pedals an upgrade so much as a necessary expense when getting a bike... kind of like a helmet.  just invest in a good bike fitting and get a few good cycling kits for training. 

best thing to do is ride your bike often and hard. 




I whole heartedly support this one. elastic laces may or may not be for you, I've done numerous tris without aeros, including 1/2 and full IMs, and have always placed in the top in the bike leg so if you are just starting, and sprint and oly courses tend to not benefit that much from aero compared to bike handling, and fancy gadgets and helmets are fun, but not necessary until you are fully, entrenched. HOWEVER the shoes and clips are a must. a couple pairs of good tri shorts, and you are set. I would also recommend a helmet that is a little more high end as they tend to keep your head cooler when you are riding. aero helmet is a lot of money and you won't be wearing it when training, so go with the nice road helmet for now -- oh, and glasses so you aren't suddenly blinded by some bug hitting you in the eye as you are zipping along at 20 mph
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