Fevers During Training - Member Case Study

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Could these fevers be related to my training and increased fatigue? Is there anything I can do to help prevent future occurrences? Or could it just be allergies combined with increased fatigue?

Question from BrendanOB
 

I recently began training for my first triathlon, a sprint this July. In the last two weeks, I have had a 24hr fever twice. Both times started out by feeling mildy achy, then severely achy, cold, and tired by the end of the day. Lots of sleep and hydration seemed to get rid of it both times. I have never been one to get sick more than about once every year or two and have never really suffered any allergies. Could these fevers be related to my training and increased fatigue? Is there anything I can do to help prevent future occurrences? Or could it just be allergies combined with increased fatigue?
 

Answer:

 

It is very common for endurance athletes to catch colds during their training. There is some scientific evidence to support that during heavy training an athlete is more susceptible to viral illnesses, which can cause the fever, sore throat, body aches, stuffy head, etc. symptoms that can be nagging. What is important to remember is that the body needs rest and time to recover from training. Our bodies have a limited amount of resources, and strenuous exercise drain a large amount of energy so our bodies have to cut other energy expending activities; like fighting off infections. If I had the cure for the common cold I would be famous, and unless you live and train in a bubble you will be exposed to germs. The way to reduce your chances of getting an infection would be to get your proper rest, allow your body to recover fully after strenuous exercise, eat a balanced diet with a proper amount of calories for your training, and stay well hydrated.

While you are feeling sick there are two things that should keep you form exercising on that day: fever or diarrhea. The problem with both of these is there is a high risk of dehydration and heat-related illnesses, like heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

 

Hope this helps!

Michael A. Yorio, MD

University of Maryland Sports Medicine
 

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date: May 16, 2005

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The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) was formed in 1991 to fill a void that has existed in sports medicine from its earliest beginnings. The founders most recognized and expert sports medicine specialists realized that while there are several physician organizations which support sports medicine, there has not been a forum specific for primary care non-surgical sports medicine physicians.

FIND A SPORTS MEDICINE DOCTOR

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