Back to Square One, From a Square Far, Far Away...

author : pjsuperhawk
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Maintaining a positive attitude and a sense of priority will be my keys to success. Before summer fades into fall, I will be a Triathlete and eager to race again.

Although training began nearly nine months ago, I must defer the title of “triathlete” because I have yet to complete a triathlon. Unfortunately, I have allowed distractions, namely my career and graduate school, to interfere with my true ambitions and fitness goals. Excuses provide no positive merit for this discussion, but I hope by understanding their origins I can prevent history from repeating itself.

Recently, a period of stress and fatigue brought back my initial drive to begin training for a triathlon. Training, I have discovered, provides me an avenue to reduce stress, escape reality, and find my rhythm. It also improves my sleeping patterns, increases my confidence, and improves my overall health. As I focus my sights on a distant race, there are a few lessons from my past that I must remember in order to maintain my focus over the next 90 days.

  1. There are no certainties in life, except that learning to swim requires jumping into a pool. (Warning: Taxes, Death, and Murphy’s Laws are also certainties but should be avoided)
     
  2. Each day is limited to 24 hours. Therefore, despite my best efforts, I cannot do everything I want and get sufficient rest. Prioritization and planning will increase schedule efficiency but only to a point. Don’t be afraid to say “No!”
     
  3. Group training will increase intensity and motivation for those early morning workouts. Varied workouts increase focus and will serve to prevent boredom.
     
  4. A consistent training pattern is necessary to build endurance.
     
  5. Unlike NASCAR, bump drafting during cycling is not a good idea.
     
  6. I am not Lance Armstrong. I am not Lance Armstrong. I am not Lance Armstrong. I am not Peter Reid, Einstein, Steve Nash, Peter Forsberg, or anyone else but myself for that matter. I’m racing to challenge myself because I enjoy it.
     
  7. Racing does not influence my paycheck, thankfully, because my 5K time won’t impress anyone.
     
  8. Work is a bummer, but it puts food on the table, in addition to paying for entry fees and gear. It is a blessing to live and work in a country where deadlines and corporate politics rather than how to feed my family consume a day’s worry.

Maintaining a positive attitude and a sense of priority will be my keys to success. Before summer fades into fall, I will be a Triathlete, eager to race again and write another list of lessons learned. I also want to thank BT members for posting tips, experiences, and motivational stories for the rest of us. Those stories provide rookies, like me, with helpful information to get us involved in the world of multi-sport.

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date: May 30, 2005

pjsuperhawk