General Discussion Triathlon Talk » Medical Conditions And Triathlons/Ironman Rss Feed  
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2013-10-28 7:47 PM


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Subject: Medical Conditions And Triathlons/Ironman
I'm the wrong side of 40.
Slowly changing from a couch potato into something a little fitter ( Fully done could take me 6-9 months, however )
Trying to learn to swim properly.
I also have mild cerebal palsy down my right hand body side.

Can someone with this type of disability take part in triathlons? Everyone in the triathlon magazines seem to be physically perfect. That's not me, I know that. I just want to know if taking part is a good idea.

Any thoughts?


2013-10-28 8:02 PM
in reply to: saint100

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Subject: RE: Medical Conditions And Triathlons/Ironman

Originally posted by saint100 I'm the wrong side of 40. Slowly changing from a couch potato into something a little fitter ( Fully done could take me 6-9 months, however ) Trying to learn to swim properly. I also have mild cerebal palsy down my right hand body side. Can someone with this type of disability take part in triathlons? Everyone in the triathlon magazines seem to be physically perfect. That's not me, I know that. I just want to know if taking part is a good idea. Any thoughts?

If your physician approves your exercise regimine I would say go for it! Triathlon magazines mostly show the elite athletes. I looked like 200 pounds of chewed bubblegum and finished a sprint.

Now, if Ironman is your goal there may be some things to address later down the road. But there's no reason you can complete a tri.

 

2013-10-28 8:05 PM
in reply to: saint100

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Subject: RE: Medical Conditions And Triathlons/Ironman

I've never heard of a race excluding someone due to a medical condition.  As long as you've discussed it with your doctor, and they don't have any concerns, I think it's great!  Triathlon can be a fun way to help stay motivated to maintain a healthy lifestyle long term.

Don't let the pictures you see in magazines intimidate you.  In races you will see a much wider range of shapes and sizes.  Most of the community is very welcoming and will encourage everyone.

 

2013-10-28 8:09 PM
in reply to: saint100

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Subject: RE: Medical Conditions And Triathlons/Ironman
I would ask for some recommendations from a doctor familiar with your form or cerabal palsy and triathlons. Most people in general don't know much about what goes on during a triathlon other than when you tell them it involves the act of swimming, biking, and running. I think it would be great if you could participate in triathlons, but a doctor with knowledge of triathlons might be able to give you better advice or how to take better precautions when training and racing.
2013-10-28 8:16 PM
in reply to: TriMyBest


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Subject: RE: Medical Conditions And Triathlons/Ironman
Goodness that was quick. The responses, I mean.

Although I live in Tennessee now, I'm from England and my English doctor never stopped me from doing anything physical which was positive as I've had CB since birth anyway.

Thanks again for the positive vibes from you both. I really love this site.
2013-10-28 8:30 PM
in reply to: saint100

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Subject: RE: Medical Conditions And Triathlons/Ironman

I'm excited you want to do a tri and joined BT to learn more!

Some races do ask medical questions but only to help medial staff have information about you in case they need to help you.

I agree with others check with your current doc and if you get the go ahead, go for it.

Do you know how to swim? If not work on that with some quality lessons if your budget allows as swimming is most technical and often hardest to learn as an adult.

Also I'd suggest strating with a sprint distance race so you build gradually and learn doing shorter races. Triathlon has so many cool races of different distances that all can be amazing and fun.



2013-10-28 8:32 PM
in reply to: saint100

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Subject: RE: Medical Conditions And Triathlons/Ironman
Agree with what everyone has said. As long as your doc says its cool then go for it!

Don't worry about what those people look like in tri magazines there in there for a reason - they look good (well, there probably good triathletes to). You shouldn't let that stop you from pursuing your goals and dreams.

I probably looked like a zombie from the walking dead after I finished my first triathlon - but I was hooked and have finished several more. Best of luck to you!
2013-10-28 8:34 PM
in reply to: saint100

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Subject: RE: Medical Conditions And Triathlons/Ironman
If your form of CP allows you to swim, bike, and run, I don't see why you would be excluded from participating. What does your doctor say?

That said, when you register for a tri, you sign a waiver absolving the race organizer/director of responsibility if something happens to you, and that you are capable of doing the event.

Of course, in magazines, you're going to see really fit people. Go to a race, and you'll see a (relative) handful of them. The rest are regular joes. Don't let what you see in magazines intimidate you from being part of a great sport! Good luck to you!!!
2013-10-28 8:44 PM
in reply to: KathyG

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Subject: RE: Medical Conditions And Triathlons/Ironman
Be patient and have fun!
I don't know much about cerebral palsy, but being a couch potato in your 40s, I'd say you shouldn't expect to kill it at tris in 6-9 mos. You should be able to complete a tri in that time, though.
For perspective, I started doing tris in my early 30s, after being a runner (well, jogger) for most of my adult life, and having completed several MS 150s (150 miles of biking over 2 days). I was able to complete a tri wtih about 4 mos. of training, but it took my over 2 years to get to where I could swim competently.
Even at local sprint tris, those who win/ place are either genetically gifted, or have put a ton of effort into training over serveral years, at least..
That's not to say you can't complete a tri, or that you won't enjoy it. But some people think if they work hard for a few months they'll be on a podium. That's not realistic for most of us.
But it's true that as a whole triathlons are more welcoming than other sports. Everyone's saying "good job" whether they're passing or being passed, and almost all are wiling to help other competitors.
2013-10-29 5:32 AM
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Subject: RE: Medical Conditions And Triathlons/Ironman

I don't see any reason why not.  There is a big race here in FL called St. Anthony's and I have seen a girl with CP competing in it for many years.  You probably are not going to set any land speed records but neither am I  I have seen blind people doing tris, the girl with CP people missing limbs and with congenital problems. All of whom are usually faster than me    

Also lots of good suggestions above but you might want to look into the challenged athletes foundation because they may have some info for you or there is a running group associated with the NYC marathon that I think is called Achilles ______  that may have some help as well.

Train on and welcome to BT



Edited by Socks 2013-10-29 5:34 AM
2013-10-29 5:37 AM
in reply to: chayes


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Subject: RE: Medical Conditions And Triathlons/Ironman
Originally posted by chayes

Be patient and have fun!
I don't know much about cerebral palsy, but being a couch potato in your 40s, I'd say you shouldn't expect to kill it at tris in 6-9 mos. You should be able to complete a tri in that time, though.
For perspective, I started doing tris in my early 30s, after being a runner (well, jogger) for most of my adult life, and having completed several MS 150s (150 miles of biking over 2 days). I was able to complete a tri wtih about 4 mos. of training, but it took my over 2 years to get to where I could swim competently.
Even at local sprint tris, those who win/ place are either genetically gifted, or have put a ton of effort into training over serveral years, at least..
That's not to say you can't complete a tri, or that you won't enjoy it. But some people think if they work hard for a few months they'll be on a podium. That's not realistic for most of us.
But it's true that as a whole triathlons are more welcoming than other sports. Everyone's saying "good job" whether they're passing or being passed, and almost all are wiling to help other competitors.


Seriously I feel the only thing that will be "killed" in a triathlon would be my body, nothing more. I just want to compete and finish in the events, nothing more. THAT would be my victory. I just want the tee-shirt from the event saying I'd completed the event, you know?
I just want to compete against myself and the course, and if I beat someone to the finishing line, well that's an added bonus in itself


2013-10-29 5:57 AM
in reply to: saint100

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Subject: RE: Medical Conditions And Triathlons/Ironman
Originally posted by saint100

I'm the wrong side of 40.
Slowly changing from a couch potato into something a little fitter ( Fully done could take me 6-9 months, however )
Trying to learn to swim properly.
I also have mild cerebal palsy down my right hand body side.

Can someone with this type of disability take part in triathlons? Everyone in the triathlon magazines seem to be physically perfect. That's not me, I know that. I just want to know if taking part is a good idea.

Any thoughts?


It's a great idea!

If you get a doctors clearance then go for it mate.

There's a wide range of athletic ability participating in triathlon - more so in the states, especially in the shorter distances. I am so far from physically perfect I can't even see it although I don't have any disabilities (unless you include cake addiction).

I have been overtaken in races by people with one leg (on a bike in Austria), one arm (on the run in Milton Keynes) and various other physical disabilities - and no doubt there are plenty in front of me that I never see.

Good luck, keep posting your progress and kudos to you for wanting to get it done.
2013-10-29 6:01 AM
in reply to: saint100

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Subject: RE: Medical Conditions And Triathlons/Ironman
My 29 year old son has mild cerebral palsy and just did the Marine Corps Marathon on Sunday.

He went through several procedures when he was young, starting at about 3 years-old.. He spent several years in a leg brace and went through a lot of PT and OT.

I'd second the previous suggestions to consult with your doctor before starting any serious training for their advice. I'd also suggest findind a sports therapist who is supportive and had experience in similar cases.

My son has experienced some knee and ankle issues over the years due to his off-balance running gait. He's spent a lot of time in the gym over the years working on correcting muscle imbalances and flexibility.. The strength training has helped a lot, but his limp still becomes more pronounced when he gets tired; that seems to be when he becomes more susceptable to injuries.

He started running while he was in college and did his first half marathon shortly after he graduated. The race on Sunday was his first full marathon.

Without sounding too much like a proud parent, my son's attitude has been his biggest asset. He is very determined and has not allowed his medical challenges to limit his ambitions.

Hope this helps. Good luck to you.

Mark
2013-10-29 6:21 AM
in reply to: Socks

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Subject: RE: Medical Conditions And Triathlons/Ironman

Originally posted by Socks

I don't see any reason why not.  There is a big race here in FL called St. Anthony's and I have seen a girl with CP competing in it for many years.  You probably are not going to set any land speed records but neither am I  I have seen blind people doing tris, the girl with CP people missing limbs and with congenital problems. All of whom are usually faster than me    

Also lots of good suggestions above but you might want to look into the challenged athletes foundation because they may have some info for you or there is a running group associated with the NYC marathon that I think is called Achilles ______  that may have some help as well.

Train on and welcome to BT

Amen to all of the above, especially the welcome bit

My first triathlon ever was a benefit for Challenged Athletes Foundation--I saw triathletes of every kind of ability out there (and yes, all of whom were faster than me!), and then just regular fat crazy people like me --and then plenty of magazine fasties too. It was great.

Dude in my profile pic (I'm the chick) is blind and has severe scoliosis ... he's one of the world's most accomplished Paralympians (swimming) and is now training to do an Ironman. And yes, I mean the race too.

Like everyone else said, if you can, talk to a medical professional knowledgeable both about CP and sports physiology. A very sharp physical therapist who's worked with a wide range of challenged athletes could be great. If you can't, then find groups like mentioned who can give you good information. (Do that anyway of course).

Good luck!

 

2013-10-29 7:43 AM
in reply to: TriAya

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Subject: RE: Medical Conditions And Triathlons/Ironman
Originally posted by TriAya

Dude in my profile pic (I'm the chick) is blind and has severe scoliosis ... he's one of the world's most accomplished Paralympians (swimming) and is now training to do an Ironman. And yes, I mean the race too.

 




Ha Ha Ha. Once I figured it out, that made me chuckle. A lot!

To the OP.... some of the most inspiring stories in triathlon are the people who bust through their limitations. I am sure that if you are motivated and put in the work that you will be great at triathlon, even if you don't look like a pro.
2013-10-29 8:05 AM
in reply to: RedCorvette

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Subject: RE: Medical Conditions And Triathlons/Ironman
Originally posted by RedCorvette

My 29 year old son has mild cerebral palsy and just did the Marine Corps Marathon on Sunday.
  • ..
  • Without sounding too much like a proud parent, my son's attitude has been his biggest asset. He is very determined and has not allowed his medical challenges to limit his ambitions.



    I saw someone with cerebral palsy or a similar disability running the Detroit Free Press marathon with me last Sunday. I wanted to offer a special congrats to him but didn't want to sound condescending -- but I was truly inspired! Congrats to your son.

    OP, go for it! And let us know how you do.


    2013-10-29 9:51 AM
    in reply to: saint100

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    Subject: RE: Medical Conditions And Triathlons/Ironman
    Yeah, you can do it. There are plenty of people with CP that do tri's. PM me and I will send you some resources to get started. Depending on where you live, there may be some free tri camps close by that you can attend. Getting2tri for example hosts a couple of camps a year that help get disabled people the help they need for triathlons. There is also Dare2Tri, Achilles...etc.
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