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2014-02-03 10:07 PM
in reply to: Left Brain

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth

Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by Clempson

its 1%???? i've been doing 5% my for dreadmill runs and wondering how you all do it!

Go to 25% and crank the mph to 15 for an interval set.........you'll start crying. 

pass. i don't want to be the next viral gym video



2014-02-03 10:12 PM
in reply to: Clempson

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth

Originally posted by Clempson

Originally posted by Left Brain

Originally posted by Clempson

its 1%???? i've been doing 5% my for dreadmill runs and wondering how you all do it!

Go to 25% and crank the mph to 15 for an interval set.........you'll start crying. 

pass. i don't want to be the next viral gym video

It's actually pretty cool.....the trainer puts his hand in the small of your back for a spot.....and with very little pressure can keep you running at a speed you cannot run alone.....and in a couple of sessions you are doing it with no pressure from the spot....each session is a small increase in speed, elevation, or time.  The improvement is dramatic.

2014-02-04 7:15 AM
in reply to: Clempson

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth

Originally posted by Clempson

its 1%???? i've been doing 5% my for dreadmill runs and wondering how you all do it!

I've had to do that on some treadmill models. 0% actually did feel like going downhill. On others I leave it at 0-1% and works just fine.

2014-02-04 7:19 AM
in reply to: Billyk

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth
Originally posted by Billyk

Originally posted by Marvarnett

How is that treadmill going to get your ready for using the ancillary muscles that are require for outside running? The little bumps in the road that you have to avoid and account for?

Micro-tears that occur on different surfaces. The body mechanic changes as well as the pace and body angle changes that you have to accommodate for while running outside.

These are the reasons I say to stay off the treadmill as much as possible. Just like the bike trainer.



"These are the reasons I say to stay off the treadmill as much as possible."------For some of us, there is not enough daylight left after working a long day shift and treadmills fit in well. Running in dark/dim conditions at an older age is not something we look forward to.


Of coarse running outside is better, however I have found that if I run outside and the temp is under 30°F my back starts to bother me. So for me it becomes a choice of keeping my base through the winter months or starting all over again in the spring.

2014-02-04 8:03 AM
in reply to: PowerRuff

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth
I was doing manual hill repeats on my gyms mill the other day and discovered it had a negative incline ability, anyone know what the purpose or concept behind that is?

It's for people who want to practice running downhill.
2014-02-04 8:37 AM
in reply to: jennifer_runs

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth

I wish I could be one of those people that could do long workouts on a treadmill. But the static positioning (like a trainer) causes much more soreness. I'm better off with the bumps and grade changes since it doesn't stress ONE area for a prolonged time.  45 min is max for me.  

Of course, at most gyms anyways, the max is 30 minutes.



2014-02-04 8:47 AM
in reply to: Left Brain

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth
there are treadmills that you can take your route from google maps and it will adjust the sloop accordingly.

2014-02-04 10:20 AM
in reply to: jennifer_runs

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth

Originally posted by jennifer_runs
I was doing manual hill repeats on my gyms mill the other day and discovered it had a negative incline ability, anyone know what the purpose or concept behind that is?
It's for people who want to practice running downhill.

My track coach (eons ago) had us do downhill repeats on occasion.  The increased speed and slope was to train or encourage a longer stride that you normally wouldn't be able to get to during normal track sessions.  Whether the science behind that has been debunked or not since then, I'm not sure.

I sill will do downhill repeats just because I can train to go under my typical 5k pace and keep my hr in check.

2014-02-04 10:43 AM
in reply to: Marvarnett

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth
Originally posted by Marvarnett

How is that treadmill going to get your ready for using the ancillary muscles that are require for outside running? The little bumps in the road that you have to avoid and account for?

Micro-tears that occur on different surfaces. The body mechanic changes as well as the pace and body angle changes that you have to accommodate for while running outside.

These are the reasons I say to stay off the treadmill as much as possible. Just like the bike trainer.


Agree with the running on road versus treadmill sentiments above. Also, the only time I have EVER had plantar faciatis (sp) was when I was spending a lot of time on the treadmill to avoid the oppressive heat and humidity. I avoid the treadmill now
2014-02-04 11:03 AM
in reply to: topolina

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth

Doesn't sound like anyone here is going to volunteer to join me on my 24 hour treadmill run

2014-02-06 9:35 AM
in reply to: 0

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth

4:16 pace at 7% incline

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SxVqmPN2HnE&feature=youtu.be

 



Edited by Left Brain 2014-02-06 9:42 AM


2014-02-06 10:43 AM
in reply to: Left Brain

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth
Run 5 miles out into a 20 mph headwind and then 5 miles back with the wind 'pushing'.

Then get on the TM and run 10 miles.

After which run would you feel most 'spent'?
2014-02-06 11:34 AM
in reply to: jennifer_runs

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth
interesting read
2014-02-06 11:34 AM
in reply to: Rogillio


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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth
Originally posted by Rogillio

Run 5 miles out into a 20 mph headwind and then 5 miles back with the wind 'pushing'.

Then get on the TM and run 10 miles.

After which run would you feel most 'spent'?


My guess is you'd be less spent on the TM, just like you'd be less spent running outside on a calm day vs. running in a 20mph wind.
2014-02-06 2:38 PM
in reply to: jennifer_runs

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth

Originally posted by jennifer_runs I know this is one of those things that just won't go away, but here's something to read if you still believe that setting the incline at 1% makes the treadmill "more like outdoor running" or that treadmill running is fundamentally different from outdoor running. http://m.runnersworld.com/treadmills/biomechanics-expert-debunks-tr... fwiw I have often done a lot of my run training on the treadmill with good results.

Thanks for posting this.  But I think it will still never go away. 

2014-02-06 3:52 PM
in reply to: JohnnyKay

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth
and with reason. if you read the link, it confirm that for most advance athlete 1% + is more realistic. And that dosnt take into consideration the reduce change on injury by using 1%+ incline.



2014-02-06 3:55 PM
in reply to: 0

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth

Originally posted by jonnyo and with reason. if you read the link, it confirm that for most advance athlete 1% + is more realistic. And that dosnt take into consideration the reduce change on injury by using 1%+ incline.

And the improvement to running form by using 1%+ incline....especially with intervals.



Edited by Left Brain 2014-02-06 3:56 PM
2014-02-07 7:26 AM
in reply to: Left Brain

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth

Did any of these studies factor in the use of a fan?

2014-02-07 3:39 PM
in reply to: morey000

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth
Originally posted by morey000

My $0.02.

I don't really enjoy treadmill running nearly as much as outdoors - but I'm glad it's there for me when I need it.

that a HR of 150bpm on a treadmill is the same as a HR of 150bpm outside.  

Mills are great when:

1.  the weather isn't to your liking.

2.  you're injured, and you don't want to find yourself 5mi from home when your PF flairs up.  Easier just to step off.

3.  for controlled workouts, such as incline, intervals, very specific pacing.  hard to duplicate on the outdoor terrain where I run, as it's hilly.

4.  hotel fitness room in a strange/unsafe area to run.

 

I don't diss the 'mill.  they're handy training tools.  As for if a 7:20 pace on the mill is the same as a 7:20 pace outside- does it really matter?  Is your outside flat and never have any wind (or the wind is a tailwind exactly equal to your pace).  I presume that's why mills are coming out the same in slower paced running.  faster than a 7:09 pace, I guess the wind resistance starts to become significant enough to start seeing the difference.




Agree with this entirely.

I would add:

5. when the kids are sleeping and my wife is out, I can't go running outside - but I can run on the treadmill.
2014-02-07 3:46 PM
in reply to: alath

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth
On a busy residential street that are narrowed from snow constant fall, at night during a snow storm where cars are slipping and sliding all over the place it might not the the time to run outside without any lights on. I would think it would be safer and better run than half running into a snow banks constantly trying not to get hit by a car.
2014-02-09 7:16 PM
in reply to: AdventureBear

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Subject: RE: Busting the treadmill 1% incline myth
Originally posted by AdventureBear

It's more helpful to read the original blog post that the runners world article refernces

http://oeshshoes.com/2014/01/my-scientific-personal-advice-for-trea...


Hmm. I trust Suzanne's judgment a lot, so went to look at the blog post. And that turned me off. The author uses the post to market her brand of specialty running shoes, and seems a little too self-congratulatory in describing her own research, e.g., describing a recent and little cited study of hers as "seminal". Too bad - there's probably some good stuff in there, but these things had me holding my wallet.


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